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The Good Night


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#1 Evan Mabry

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Posted 17 July 2008 - 02:05 AM

Let me preface this post by saying that I am keenly interested in film, and am just starting to get hands-on experience with it, but I am still very naive about technical terms and processes. Please read this post as a question, rather than a statement. :unsure:

I saw this film because it was recommended to me on the idea that I would appreciate it "artistically". I believe they meant story-wise. However, I found myself making more judgments as to the cinematic quality. I noticed early on that it had a pretty grainy look (DVD format, watched on my laptop, Windows Media Player). I think the first time this stood out was during a shot of the main character, Gary, crossing the street to work. This shot repeats throughout the film, and some seem to be more sharp. Also, I think this was a shot that seemed a little overexposed. I began to wonder if this was due to being shot in digital format, and converted to filmstock, and then reconverted back to digital format. Does anyone know if this is how it was done? or rather, if/since I am wrong, can someone please explain the normal operating procedure for shooting in digital format?

later during the movie I noticed that when the lights are out (which is also an understandably recurring shot--black screen, sometimes with a blue digital clock display) for an extended period of time one can see a pattern in what seems to be very very grainy film. From what I know of converting HD footage to 24F, this pattern seems consistent with dropping every 3rd(?) and 5th(?) frame. Can anyone confirm this for me? or, as before, explain the process and the effect it has on converted footage.

I really liked this movie, both story wise and visually. I noticed a few slight discrepancies as far as technicalities go, some bigger than others, but here are some that bothered me a little...

1) when Gary dreams of being bedded down by multiple "Anna" characters, each dressed differently, they seemed to all be very disconnected from the character, except for the one actually interacting with Gary. For instance, the one on her hands and knees keeps looking past Gary and in the other direction. I know this is way too picky of me, but I feel like "Anna"s actions, and gazes should have been much more directed.

2) When Gary and Dora are having an argument where Dora is in the kitchen, it is apparent that there is someone from the crew on the floor of the kitchen. There is a reflection of motion besides hers (and Gary's) in the door of the Oven.


What a great movie! I really enjoyed it.
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#2 Vincent Sweeney

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Posted 19 July 2008 - 06:00 PM

For starters, you need to stop watching movies on laptops.
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#3 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 19 July 2008 - 07:08 PM

For starters, you need to stop watching movies on laptops.



Yeah, how can you judge a movie's cinematography on a DVD, and worse a SD DVD? If you watch a movie on DVD on a laptop you are looking at a proxie image at best. You can say: "the DVD looked funny on my laptop", but to say shots are over exposed, or not so sharp, you need to look at a print first.

Edited by Saul Rodgar, 19 July 2008 - 07:09 PM.

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