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About to film (Sharp Images)


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#1 Gary Douglas

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Posted 21 July 2008 - 01:00 AM

Hello All, thanks for any advice in advance.

I'm about to film a feature with a mid level digital camcorder. As far as editing is concerned i've only been tinkering around on ulead videostudio. For this I was going to use adobe afect effects so I was planning on using adobe premier with it, would this work to my advantage interchanging the footage between programs?
Also, the raw image from the cam is very sharp and clear. To make it look less "home video" I was thinking about sacrificing some quality by making the image more grainier, how would I go about this?
Lastly, are there any really simple and cheap techniques or tricks I could employ to improve the overall quality of image and shot comp?
Thanks
Cya
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#2 Matthew W. Phillips

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Posted 21 July 2008 - 02:14 AM

Gary, there is one thing that I read about not too long ago and I'm totally juiced about the idea.

I read that people who have Super 8 cameras with single frame capability (like my Elmo 1012s-xl) are able to use that to make film prints from miniDV footage. What that equates to is the ability to shoot as much miniDV footage as you want, edit it to keep only the good stuff, make your rough cut, and then make a film print from that and then you can project it or telecine it back to digital and it will have all the characteristics of film since it's an economical "film out." I did the math on it, and considering film and processing (but not telecine) you are able to get a Super 8 positive print for about $12/minute. The main benefit of doing this over shooting on Super 8 to begin with is because you only have to use film for the footage you keep. That way you can shoot at whatever shooting ratio you want.

Sorry to ramble but I wanted to present an interesting new idea for combining digital and film to create the best results possible on a budget.
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#3 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 21 July 2008 - 02:41 AM

Gary, there is one thing that I read about not too long ago and I'm totally juiced about the idea.


I did that on a DV project, but shot 16 mm instead of S8. I shot it off an LCD monitor to avoid scan lines on screen. It worked fairly well. One has to make sure that the color temperature of the screen is matched by the film's, of course, which can be a bit tricky. LCD's are generally closer to daylight balance, but not always.

The print was lost later -when I moved to my present house, along with some other irreplaceable footage. :o :( When I projected it no one seemed to be able to tell it had originated on DV (I could obviously, and for several technical reasons), but I tried hard not to blow out the highlights on the DV footage first.

Edited by Saul Rodgar, 21 July 2008 - 02:45 AM.

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#4 Gary Douglas

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Posted 21 July 2008 - 01:22 PM

Interesting approach....
Any links to any films that have used this approach so I can check out the results?

Another general question here.
Every time I capture some footage, it is quite bright on the lcd of the actual cam, and is quite bright if I play the footage raw that has been captured. But the minute I stick it into some editing software to tinker around with, it noticeably darker. This coming from the two editing packages i've used Premier Pro and Ulead VideoStudio.
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#5 monday sunnlinn

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Posted 21 July 2008 - 01:45 PM

off the top of my head, i'd say it was the gamma settings in the editing software...
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#6 David Auner aac

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Posted 21 July 2008 - 03:05 PM

Maybe that, but also the different characteristics of a computer monitor and a TV/camera lcd. The former is (usually) RGB color space and the latter is CCIR601 (at least here in the PAL world). So full white in CCIR would be only 235 on all channels in the RGB scales where the max is 255 per channel for bit. It really makes quite some difference! Maybe your software player makes some kind of adjustment for that fact, but editing software usually does not. So watch your output on a TV connected to your camera if it is DV in capable!

Cheers, Dave
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#7 John Brawley

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Posted 21 July 2008 - 06:00 PM

Interesting approach....
Any links to any films that have used this approach so I can check out the results?

.



One of Australia's more successful and loved TV shows, Frontline, was shot in a similar manner. This was just before MIni DV. They shot on Hi8 Cameras, edited and then telekine'd the results to 16mm. They then transferred that back to tape and put that to air. It was a unique look.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0108780/

jb
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#8 Gary Douglas

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Posted 23 July 2008 - 10:52 AM

Strange thing is, if I watch the footage raw that has just been ripped it looks brighter, if I watch it through the editer or post edited copy it is a alot darker.
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#9 David Auner aac

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Posted 23 July 2008 - 03:14 PM

Strange thing is, if I watch the footage raw that has just been ripped it looks brighter, if I watch it through the editer or post edited copy it is a alot darker.


See my post above!

Cheers, Dave
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#10 Gary Douglas

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Posted 23 July 2008 - 09:18 PM

Yeah thanks David.

It's a big block, cause it changes the shot from looking warm yet an overall dark tone, to very cold and bland.
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