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Filming in STEAM and VAPOR environments


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#1 Efraim Smits

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Posted 21 July 2008 - 10:21 AM

Chums,

Thanks for viewing. I need put some steam on a mirror in a white studio, but I suppose this would also be interesting for bathroom, and alike environments and set-ups.

Anyhow, humidity is my camera's phobia (as well as sand, water without a raincoat, ...), so how could we produce enough vapor on a mirror/glass for a long enough period for the actor to write something on (i.e. rudrum ;) ) and still maintain a humid-free environment for equipment?

Any ideas?

All respect to all of you for any input!

Cheers,
Efi
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#2 Efraim Smits

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Posted 21 July 2008 - 02:21 PM

I am considering freezing the mirror/glass with liquid nitrogen (just a little so it doesn't crack) and then steaming it with a humidifier... but this is too sophisticated. A little help here would be appreciated.

Thanks again!

Cheers,
E.
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#3 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 21 July 2008 - 02:49 PM

What about trying a layer of that spray on x-mas snow-dust for the writing, and then a smoke machine for the "mist/fog?"

Edited by Adrian Sierkowski, 21 July 2008 - 02:49 PM.

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#4 Efraim Smits

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Posted 21 July 2008 - 05:41 PM

...spray on x-mas snow-dust ...smoke machine.."


Thanks for input, but it won't work. 1st it'll be awfully artificial and it won't be steamy, it'll be FROST; 2st the smoke machine is not water, it's some other fluid which will not 'stick' to the mirror.

Anyhow, I've been considering making the glass really cold (sink it in an ice-tub for 30min) then dry it off and go oldschool with the teapot. I think this should technically work.

I'm still a bit surprised that nobody in this forum hasn't had hands-on experience with this kind of stuff. Steam has often been used.
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#5 Darryl Richard Humber

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Posted 21 July 2008 - 05:58 PM

Uusally the special effects guy has a steamer. It looks something like a vacuum cleaner that he uses to steam the mirror. I think they're made for steaming clothes.
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#6 Phil Savoie

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Posted 21 July 2008 - 06:58 PM

Anyhow, humidity is my camera's phobia (as well as sand, water without a raincoat, ...), so how could we produce enough vapor on a mirror/glass for a long enough period for the actor to write something on (i.e. rudrum ;) ) and still maintain a humid-free environment for equipment?


For fast temporary use I often wrap the camera and lens body separately in saran wrap (cling film in Brit speak). It affords quick protection in humid, light rain, sandy beach - salt spray etc. environs.

It is quick, easy & cheap. And it allows you to see whatever you need to to operate on the camera body. By wraping the camera and lens seperately the lens barrel and focus rings are free to travel as needed.

If your going to be in your steamy room for a long time you could also try to make a quick enviromantal housing out of a clear plastic bag. You'll still want to cut out a hole for the lens though. Rain X and Fog free, from any motorcycle shop will help keep the front lens element mist free.

cheers
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#7 Daniel Sheehy

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Posted 21 July 2008 - 08:38 PM

I suspect it'll be easier, cheaper and simpler to simply go with real steam, and devote your energy to protecting the camera.
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#8 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 22 July 2008 - 02:37 AM

You could try spraying it with cheap hairspray then use an eye dropper to add water droplets on the surface here or there but if you have a rain cover for your camera, I'd use that and get a clothes steamer (you should have one for in your wardrobe supplies for costume touch ups anyway).
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#9 Martin Hawkes

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Posted 22 July 2008 - 03:14 AM

You could try spraying it with cheap hairspray then use an eye dropper to add water droplets on the surface here or there but if you have a rain cover for your camera, I'd use that and get a clothes steamer (you should have one for in your wardrobe supplies for costume touch ups anyway).



Clothes steamer will work perfect for the mirror but add a little smoke for atmos.

Nitrogen on set would have been fun though!

Good luck.

M
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#10 Efraim Smits

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Posted 22 July 2008 - 03:22 AM

Uusally the special effects guy has a steamer. It looks something like a vacuum cleaner that he uses to steam the mirror. I think they're made for steaming clothes.


Thanks Darryl; I never knew such a device existed independently. This will definitely make things more accessible.

Rain X and Fog free, from any motorcycle shop will help keep the front lens element mist free.


Phil, you ever notice you rhyme? Thanks for the ingenious methods for using the plastic wrap.
Thanks for replying and adding your suggestions.

Best of luck all of you and thank you.
Cheers,
E.
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#11 Jason Reimer

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Posted 22 July 2008 - 04:24 PM

Totally off topic, but happy birthday, Mr. Beverly :)
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#12 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 25 July 2008 - 02:03 AM

Totally off topic, but happy birthday, Mr. Beverly :)

Hey Jason, thanks buddy. :D
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#13 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 25 July 2008 - 02:08 AM

Rain X and Fog free, from any motorcycle shop will help keep the front lens element mist free.

cheers

I would PROBABLY recommend spraying that stuff on an optical glass screw in filter and NOT directly onto the front lens element though........JUST to be on the safe side. ;)
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#14 Jason Reimer

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Posted 25 July 2008 - 10:59 AM

$20,000 lens + $1 worth of mystery chemicals = sick to my stomach :(
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Glidecam

Tai Audio

Visual Products

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Broadcast Solutions Inc

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

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