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#1 JohnSellers

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Posted 23 July 2008 - 05:26 AM

Hi,

Does anyone have a Slate template that they have created on the computer and print out for use on commercials and other productions for your standard slate? Would anyone be willing to share?

Do you cover this with any type of plastic to write on it and protect it and also easily interchange them between jobs? What works the best?

Thanks for your help :)
John
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 23 July 2008 - 10:10 AM

I'm not sure I gather what you're asking. . . But it seems you mean a clapper/slate on set.

Most of these are either smart slates -w- timecode or dumb slates, but all of them are written on in either chalk (dumb llates) or dry-erase markers. Oftentimes, they have gaff tape-numbers on the back of them, made up for quickly throwing on shot/scene etc.
Normally, the info sch as shoot/camera/director doesn't change much on the set.

For post slates, these are often dictated by the delivery requirements, e/g slate for 30 seconds of name/director/date of edit/ tc in tc out and TRT.
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#3 JohnSellers

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Posted 24 July 2008 - 02:38 AM

Hi Adrian,

Thanks for replying. Sorry I don't think I asked my question clearly enough and was very tired when I typed it out, sorry.

I do understand how the slating process works and my question does refer to the actual clapper board itself and use on set.

I saw someone (in another city) have a slate that they had made up (I assume in something like word) for a dumb slate (without timecode) and they had made a slate layout with the roll/scene/take typed out (exactly as you see on the slate itself) and they just typed the name of the production, director, DP etc... and then put this 'template' over the top of the slate and covered it with some sort of plastic to write on with a dry-erase marker for the roll/scene/take. It looked very clean and neat and easy to read. Better than just using camera tape and hand writing - as I normally do.

I was thinking that it would be great to do this and then just type out the info for when a shoot comes up and then 'slipping' the typed up template into the plastic cover so it can be easily transferrable between shoots.

The reason I ask the question here is because I am very useless when it comes to doing anything in word other than just straight typing and thought someone here might currently do this and have the size and everything perfecty worked out already and would be happy to pass it on. Also while I'm here I should ask if anyone does the same with a timecode slate and could pass it on, so I don't have to ask again later.

Anyhelp would be greatly appreciated, otherwise I will have to find a friend who has the computer skills and see if they could do it for me.

Thanks,
John
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#4 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 24 July 2008 - 02:49 AM

That seems like a lot of work... If you own a slate already, it's probably already got "ROLL" "SCENE" "TAKE", etc. printed or engraved on it. You can just buy a 1" label maker and print labels for the production title, director, dp, date, for each job which looks very neat and professional. Most of the sound guys I've worked with who bring a TC slate use this method. I still use white camera tape and a sharpie on mine, no one from production has complained yet. I do make the handwriting very neat, though.
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#5 Salvador Vega

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Posted 27 July 2008 - 03:01 PM

I have a p-touch label maker and use 1" Black on Clear labels. That way if you have a light source from behind the slate you can easily read the slate without having a hard light on the front from a flashlight. Works on smart slates also. Looks great and clean.

Also I have seen custom dumb slates on a number of features that were made from Trophy and custom engraving stores. You can have a custom logo for your show and use a custom font or type face and have the productions name, directors name and DOPs name engraved. Looks really great though it does cost, even more so than buying a don earl slate.
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#6 Kirsty Stark

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Posted 07 August 2008 - 10:07 AM

Hey John,

I have one that someone else made for a timecode slate... don't have one for a regular slate though. It's a Photoshop document and you can easily change the text to suit your production. If you want me to email it to you, send me a PM with your address.

Kirsty.
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#7 Gunnar Mortensen

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Posted 20 August 2008 - 04:11 PM

Don't waste your time just get a P-touch from staples and 1in black on clear tape. Have production pay for it.
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#8 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 20 August 2008 - 09:24 PM

I still use white camera tape and a sharpie on mine, no one from production has complained yet. I do make the handwriting very neat, though.


My first feature gig, after Production watched the dailies from the first couple days, someone approached the sound guys about creating a specially engraved & decorative slate for us after I had been using just a basic Earl slate with white tape & a sharpie. I could only suggest a trophy shop or something, but Production soon lost interest so it didn't matter in the end.

I keep looking at that 1" P-touch on Amazon...but I've yet to take the plunge and purchase it. I keep hoping that some future gig will just buy one for me ;)
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#9 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 21 August 2008 - 01:26 AM

I keep looking at that 1" P-touch on Amazon...but I've yet to take the plunge and purchase it. I keep hoping that some future gig will just buy one for me ;)

Ebay, my friend. I finally broke down and bought one. Mine was $50 including shipping but you might be able to find one for less.
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#10 Gunnar Mortensen

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Posted 21 August 2008 - 11:37 AM

Production does pay for it through a kit or box rental. $50 is nothing for a Ptouch compared to what it does (Slate, Filter Tags, Labeling your Kit) a Macbeth chart just sits there and it is $80. I use 10-20% of my paycheck to buy more stuff for my ever expanding kit. That way my box rental goes up next time I go out too. I am starting to get $50 a day for my AKS without my cart or sticks. You also look better organized and professional. If your complaining on the price of a Ptouch wait til you are thinking about buying an Oconner 2575 Head ($8,000) or Filter Set ($12,00) or Preston($20,00). These all add up, but a friend of mine that goes out gets $650 a day for him and $700 for his gear; which all payed off has now doubled his day rate.
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#11 Johnathan Holmes

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Posted 10 September 2008 - 01:03 AM

P-Touch is a must-have for any camera assistant. I use it for just about everything from labeling my own gear to making filter tags with velcro backs, to labeling the slates.

Most bigger-budget features or TV shows will have a faceplate made up that fits over the timecode slate with their specific show title and information on it. The faceplate is usually a thin piece of white plastic that is velcroed on.
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