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battery powered lighting


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#1 Ryan Jones

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Posted 23 July 2008 - 01:50 PM

Hello, I am looking for any ideas you might have on battery powered lighting.

I work in a theatre and we are starting to do more filming of various things to promote shows. Sometimes we film interviews and the lighting is very awkward. I would love to buy a light kit (anything at all) but I have a unique situation to work around. Due to the union rules with the stage hands to work with the lighting and electrical things in the theatre, I can?t plug in any lights without getting someone union to do it, and that costs so much that it makes it not worth doing. BUT, if its battery powered, I can get around all of that. It's a bit of a shame that there are SO many light instruments in this theatre and I can't use any of them.

I have looked around and there is no obvious solution to me. We are a non-profit theatre, and I don?t have a lot of money to spend on this. I am hoping for a 3 point light system that will run off battery for at least an hour (the more the better). My guess is that this system might have to be a bit hacked together, but all ideas are welcome.

Thanks for your help
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#2 John Sprung

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Posted 23 July 2008 - 02:02 PM

For interviews, you might be better off simply going to a different location. Something that small can be shot in an ordinary living room or even a dressed garage.

If you really have to, I'm thinking a couple golf cart batteries, an inverter, and some Kino-Flo's.



-- J.S.
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#3 Joe Giambrone

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Posted 03 August 2008 - 02:36 PM

There are LED lights that are very expensive but very low power. You might want to DIY from some locally available ones (home depot).

You might be able to go middle ground. Get some CFL soft boxes and a power supply like this:

http://www.inverters...e...&ProdID=100
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#4 Patrick Nuse

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Posted 03 August 2008 - 02:36 PM

If you want to use standard tungsten lights you can use ten 12v batteries in series. (If thats in your budget). Anyone with some basic electronics skills can help you set up a small cart with a set of small wet cells like the ones used in ride on lawnmowers. you can buy them at your local Walmart. they are pretty cheap. you will need to be shure that it is setup in such a way that there is no elecrocution hazard though. 120v DC is much more dangerous than 120v AC. if you only need a few hours of runtime you can get 10 of the small 12v gel cells that are used in emergency lighting. you can find those at a hardware store. they are typically $20 each. they are about 7AH. which allows you 400 Watts of light for about 2 hours. or 800 for one hour etc.
Definitely a hack solution but it has been done before. just be shure that whoever puts it together is very familiar with electrical safety.
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