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T4 and Oz


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#1 Vincent Sweeney

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Posted 27 July 2008 - 09:52 PM

This is a copy of part of an article on T4. Curious if anyone knows more about how they are going about processing. The key words below being "inspired by". Also read that Arnold may make an appearance... a CGI assisted one?

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All three Terminator films took place present day, with Terminators traveling back in time to attack. This picture takes place after Judgment Day. It happened. Everything is gone. The story of the movie is the "brink moment" Reese always talked about.

From a technical perspective, we have set out to achieve a completely new visual style that hasn't been seen before. We're shooting the film on color stock but are using a method inspired by the Oz process which was developed at Technicolor by Mike Zacharia and Bob Olson. Basically we are adding three times as much silver. It creates a surreal texture that is in keeping with the notion of the entire picture - feeling detached from the world we know today.
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#2 Ayz Waraich

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Posted 28 July 2008 - 10:18 AM

Also curious to hear more about this. Visual examples would help. What effect does adding silver have? Are there any prior examples of this method that one could point out with screengrabs?

Calling the more experienced DP's here, if they have a minute or two. :)
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#3 Mitch Gross

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Posted 28 July 2008 - 10:41 AM

It's bleach bypass. By skipping this step it leaves excess silver on the negative, which, when printed makes for an image with more contrast and deeper blacks.
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#4 Vincent Sweeney

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Posted 28 July 2008 - 11:33 AM

Isn't OZ more than just standard bleach bypass? I recall reading about it recently but my brain is full of other things and I don't know where that article was. Technicolor's web site says American Gangster was the first to go through it. Is it just a print treatment process and not something that affects the negative?
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#5 Dana Gonzales

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Posted 15 August 2008 - 12:59 AM

I personally did not like the print that I saw of "American Gangster". I wished it had a little more color. I love desaturated images but felt the OZ process took it to far. The look was a little to muddy as well. I love the cinematography of Harris Savides but just did not like the OZ process.

Also after viewing the DVD which I am sure was scanned from the negative not the print, I felt it did not look at all the same. So why print with OZ when the DVD looks so different.

Of course I would love to print in the Dye Sublimation process anyway so maybe that is why people will choose OZ

I would love to see the OZ process with more color in the production design. I love bleach bypass with desaturated color.








Also curious to hear more about this. Visual examples would help. What effect does adding silver have? Are there any prior examples of this method that one could point out with screengrabs?

Calling the more experienced DP's here, if they have a minute or two. :)


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#6 Mike Williamson

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Posted 15 August 2008 - 12:41 PM

Vincent, the OZ process is only done on the print and is different than bleach bypass. If you reread the AC article on "American Gangster" it should give you an idea of what the differences are, it's a proprietary process so the Technicolor guys won't give you too many details of exactly how it works.

I really enjoyed the print I saw of "American Gangster", they were extremely sharp and after seeing something from a 2K DI the day before, contact printing looked sweet. I thought the lighting was great, very dark and natural. The desaturation worked for me, but it would be interesting to compare it with another film that did something more colorful and used the OZ process.

Dana, it's cool to see you posting on this board, I'm looking forwards to seeing "Man in the Chair", hopefully it will be on DVD sometime soon.
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#7 Richard Vialet

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Posted 15 August 2008 - 06:53 PM

OZ seems similar to Deluxe's CCE process where silver is added to the print and cannot be varied (unlike Technicolor's ENR and Deluxe's ACE processes, which can be scaled), producing a harsh silver retention look with darker blacks, more contrast, and desaturated colors.

So i guess you can think of OZ as Technicolor's "un-scalable" version of ENR

I also liked the print of American Gangster and thought the design was one of the best parts of the film.
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