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#1 Matthew Fuller

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Posted 29 July 2008 - 12:29 PM

Hello all.

I am completely new to this board and look forward to being a member. That aside, I am prepping to shoot an entire feature on Super 8mm. I am having a friend loan me a Cannon 1014 XL-S since he has and probably never will use it.

This is all new to me. I have always shot on Digital so I haven't the faintest on how to operate an 8mm camera.

The film will be in color. I do know that but I guess it's personal preference as to what film stock I want to use. I will have to keep looking into that.

I have no idea how to use a light meter in regards to setting the exposure levels. I have been hunting around on this site for a how to guide for dummies but haven't found any. If anyone could point me in the right direction that would be great.

I also have no idea how to use a tape measure in regards to focal length. I know, I know. So the same as above. Pointing me in the right direction would be great!

And yeah, I will leave on that note. This seems like a great site and I'm glad I found this thing!

Thanks guys.
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 29 July 2008 - 12:39 PM

Ok, exposure meters. . simply put you plug in the ASA and the shutter speed to this little calculator, and using the "incident meter"- with the little white "lumisphere" [white 1/3 cirlce to approximate a 3d Object] stand where the subject would be, point the lumisphere towards the camera and press the button. The reading, normally in F-stop, though depends on meter, is what you set your lens for.
For measuring, you start the tape at the film focal plans, normally denoted on the camera body by what looks like an 0 with a line | through it. Then you measure to your subject. This will give you how many "feet," to set the lens at so that focus falls at this point (this is assuming a properly collimated lens."
A lot of good S8mm shooters are on this board and most of the skills from other formats, 16mm/35mm will translate over.

The problem you might run into is with a S8mm camera who has an odd shutter angle, for example a 180 degree shutter is 1/48th exposure. . .there is a formula for it (from Wikipedia; http://en.wikipedia....i/Shutter_speed ):

In cinematography, shutter speed is a function of the frame rate and shutter angle. Most motion picture film cameras use a rotating shutter with a shutter angle of 165° or 180°, which leaves the film exposed for about 1/48 or 1/50 second at a standard 24 frame/s.[5]

Where E = Exposure, F = Frames per second, and S = Shutter angle:
Posted Image
Posted Image

And yes, that's all I can think of off of the top of my head.

Remember, in color, in case you don't know, though most people do, T film stands for Tungsten (film balanced for 3200K tungsten which is "inside lights") and D film for Daylight, 5600K for the sun (sorry if you ,know that already but a lot of people don't). Exposing T film in daylight without filtration will tint everything blue, whereas exposing D film to T will yield orange. So if you have a scene of mixed lighting, you have to bring one in balance with the other, or you can just leave it be if you want that effect.

Edited by Adrian Sierkowski, 29 July 2008 - 12:40 PM.

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#3 Matthew Fuller

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Posted 29 July 2008 - 02:36 PM

Thank you much. Very helpful. I was waiting for someone to tell me to screw off and figure it out on my own...
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#4 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 29 July 2008 - 02:40 PM

Not in this forum ;)
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#5 Matthew Fuller

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Posted 29 July 2008 - 02:44 PM

Thank you much. Very helpful. I was waiting for someone to tell me to screw off and figure it out on my own...
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#6 Jim Carlile

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Posted 30 July 2008 - 01:59 AM

Here's the manual. It's free for the download.

http://www.apecity.c...uals/index.html

You just set a few knobs on the camera and you're ready to go-- don't worry about an external meter
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Wooden Camera

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Visual Products

Rig Wheels Passport