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Changing the shot


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#1 Gary Douglas

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Posted 05 August 2008 - 09:56 AM

Hi, I've got some footage. Not much of it is going to be used, probably about 10 seconds worth. But the subject is weaing a tear shirt design in black against the plain green of the shirt? Can I get rid of the design and change it to the green colour? Is it a matter of airbrushing each frame out? How will I go about doing this?
Thanks for your help
cya.
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#2 Phil Connolly

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Posted 05 August 2008 - 11:02 AM

Yes its possible to paint the logo out, though quite time consuming.

Its usually done using products such as the paint tool's in Shake, After Effects or Silhouette. Its not something I would attempt with the airbrush tool in something like photo shop as you need to be able to paint onto the frames and animate through them - to make sure it looks smooth in motion and doesn't boil. (eg the painted areas look unnatural during movement or move on their own accord)

In photoshop you would be able to touch up the individual frames so the look good when still, but they might not look smooth when stung together, and moving if that makes sense. It might be doable, depending on the shot, but I doubt it would be seamless

In something like Shake, you can keep playing the section and keep scrubbing back and forth to make sure the painted frames work together.
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#3 Paul Bruening

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Posted 05 August 2008 - 11:05 AM

Green shirt with black pattern? Could he just use a composite matte to fill in the pattern and avoid all that painting?
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#4 John Sprung

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Posted 05 August 2008 - 12:53 PM

Green shirt with black pattern? Could he just use a composite matte to fill in the pattern and avoid all that painting?

It depends on how good a matte they can pull on the shirt. If it wasn't shot with that intention, it usually doesn't work well at all. As the light falls off on the shadow side of the shirt, you have to be very lucky for it to still be green enough to pull a sharp edge.




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#5 Gary Douglas

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Posted 05 August 2008 - 12:58 PM

Just very quick shots though, 10 seconds of the subject with the shirt on max, although it is 4 seperate shots.
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#6 Phil Connolly

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Posted 05 August 2008 - 02:53 PM

Just very quick shots though, 10 seconds of the subject with the shirt on max, although it is 4 seperate shots.


Its hard to give detailed answers without seeing the shots, regarding what would work and not work and how long things take. It depends a lot on how the light is hitting the, shirt, if its creased, how it moves, textures, shadows etc..

If it wasn't too technically demanding with no shadows over the logo and not too much movement - it could be done in about 2 days by a good paint artist, it would take longer if the shots were more difficult or if you have less experienced paint artist/shake op.

It also depends how large the object is in frame and how perfect you need it to look
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#7 Gary Douglas

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Posted 05 August 2008 - 06:08 PM

2 days?
Arghhhh.
10 secs, 2 days?
not sounding too good :(

Edited by Gary Douglas, 05 August 2008 - 06:09 PM.

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#8 Chris Forbes

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Posted 07 August 2008 - 06:11 PM

2 days?
Arghhhh.
10 secs, 2 days?
not sounding too good :(



Hence the joke "We'll fix it in post" I feel your pain I am doing a similar thing to a piece of footage it is not fun.
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#9 Igor Ridanovic

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Posted 08 August 2008 - 06:55 PM

Download a "Mocha" trial version and give it a shot. It's a superb tracking software.
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#10 Steve Phipps

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Posted 09 August 2008 - 06:06 AM

What format is the original footage? And what is your work-flow here?

What I'm wondering is, if you could do some kind of "color correction" on the shirt. That could be a relatively quick fix.

If you were doing telecine, for example -- and I seem to remember the same tool in FinalCut, though I'm not positive -- the colorist could try to pick out the hue of the logo or the shirt, and adjust it. You would also have a masking tool. I don't know what shade of green you have, but, possibly, you could work with the saturation and contrast. You might have to do something radical (ugly) to get it to work that way (also, would there be a color-continuity issue outside of these ten seconds?), but it might be a cheap option.
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#11 Keith Mottram

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Posted 09 August 2008 - 07:18 AM

This is a piece of string question, because there are so many variables. depending on how much shadows there are caused by the folds in the t-shirt the simplest way would be to 'pull' the black on the logo and replace with green, this could be done in DI/ Grade, or it might need frame by frame. I would try that first though, you'd also need to garbage matt the t-shirt otherwise you'd change all the other blacks in the frame. I would ask yourself whether you need to get rid of the logo completely or whether you could just significantly knock it back, if you are happy to knock it back then the grade/ garbage matt route will probably be reasonably painless- providing you have decent gear/ operators.

keith
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