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Panasonic HDX-900 - 60p converting to 24p


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#1 Bill Paul

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Posted 15 August 2008 - 03:16 PM

Hey guys,

Just shot with the Panasonic HDX-900. I am the director on this shoot not the cinematographer. And I have VERY LITTLE HD experience so I relied on my D.P. to shoot this correctly. I wanted a filmic look. We just didn't have the budget for film.

My D.P. told me that he was going to shoot this at 60p. And that it will "look great."

It looks like ass. It's crunchier than COURT TV. What do I do??? Why the heck didn't he shoot this at 24p. Now that it's at the editor and I see what I'm working with I'm freaked out!!! Can this be fixed? I mean I shot with a three thousand dollar 24p panasonic consumer camera on 24p and the footage looked WAY better than the crap we shot last week.

The lighting is great. The composition is great. This DP is great with film. Unfortunately, the stuff we shot is soooo crispy, it looks like a used car ad on late night tv.

HELP! Is there software I can use to fix this? Can I take it into flame? Do some crummy 3-2 pulldown? Or did he just totally screw the pooch by shooting this at 60p?

Thanks,
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#2 Andreas Wessberg FSF

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Posted 17 August 2008 - 02:36 PM

Hi Bill!

First I want to say that I live in pal country and I´m not a tech wizzard.
But I´m shure you can fix this.
If it´s shoot in 60p it looks like interlaced but with better resolution, right.
If it was shoot interlace it would be simple to do a deinterlace to it, but as far as I know it´s alittle trickier
to interpolate two full frames instead of as in interlaced two fields.
Here in europe we shoot video at 50p or 25p so we don´t have to bother about the 3-2 pulldown, don´t know if this 3-2
will make it harder for you to convert 60p to 25/24p
But I know it´s been done, so just relax and
wait for someone who can explain the details.

good luck

andreas
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#3 John Sprung

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Posted 18 August 2008 - 12:41 PM

Shooting at 60 is a real bad mistake. There are interpolation attempts that can be made in post, but none of them are as good as real 24p. Really good temporal interpolation would require object recognition in software. There were some guys at HPA a couple years ago who had a good beginning on that, but were still up against the problem of revealed surfaces. Cracking that one will be much more important overall in the field of robot vision than in entertainment.



-- J.S.
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#4 Chad Stockfleth

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Posted 21 August 2008 - 11:43 AM

Was the whole show shot at 60p or were portions of it intended for slo-mo shot at 60p?

Is there sound synched?

You can run it through FCP's frame rate converter, change it to 23.98 which would make it slow motion, but that definitely won't work with synched audio.

60p is lame.

Chad
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#5 Stephen Price

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Posted 23 August 2008 - 05:38 AM

What does 60p look like in NTSC? If it is 60 frames per second, then why is it not slow motion?

Thanks
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