Jump to content


Photo

Canon 310XL And Vision2 500T


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 stephenbyron

stephenbyron
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 18 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 20 August 2008 - 01:46 PM

Can I trust that the light sensor on my Canon 310xl will meter Kodak Vision2 500T film accurately?
  • 0

#2 Chris Burke

Chris Burke
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1675 posts
  • Boston, MA

Posted 20 August 2008 - 06:34 PM

Can I trust that the light sensor on my Canon 310xl will meter Kodak Vision2 500T film accurately?



the 7218 film cart does not have a notch for the internal 85 filter, so it is disengaged. I would cut a notch in the cart so the filter can be used. For artificial or daylight the camera will expose the film one stop over, so you are all set there.
  • 0

#3 Jim Carlile

Jim Carlile
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 464 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 21 August 2008 - 05:05 AM

The Canon 310 will overexpose 500T by at least one stop, because the meter will only read as high as ASA 250. That's OK, though-- it's actually how Kodak prefers this film to be exposed. They notch it for ASA 400 and then use the daylight filter-notchless cartridge to kick it down to ASA 250.

But, you must cut a filter notch in your cartridge in order to read ASA 250 in your camera. Otherwise, the camera will read the film at ASA 250, and then kick it down to ASA 160 because of the notchless cartridge-- too low. If you cut a filter notch and allow the filter pin to stay out, this triggering will not occur.

Then you have the option-- internal 85 filter or not? If you want the internal filter, just slide the filter switch to daylight, if not, then keep it at bulb. The film will still be rated at ASA 250 no matter your choice. If you have the switch at bulb and prefer an external 85, same thing.

Edited by Jim Carlile, 21 August 2008 - 05:06 AM.

  • 0

#4 stephenbyron

stephenbyron
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 18 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 21 August 2008 - 07:39 PM

Thanks guys.
I'm gonna have to find a thread about how to notch a cartride w/o destroying it !!!

I'm surprised to hear that kodak want it's 500 asa film rated at 250asa?
I was worried about my Beaulieu only going up to asa 400, but I guess I'll just set it to 250 for best results with this film?
How about the vision200. What I should I rate that at? Kodak website says 200 tungsten and 125 daylight?
  • 0

#5 Art Leal

Art Leal
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 145 posts
  • Other
  • New York City

Posted 21 August 2008 - 09:09 PM

Thanks guys.
I'm gonna have to find a thread about how to notch a cartride w/o destroying it !!!



Hope this helps.


  • 0

#6 Nate Moore

Nate Moore

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Student

Posted 22 August 2008 - 12:26 PM

I am a student, and am a bit confused about the reason for cutting the notch, and am hoping someone could explain the whole thing to me.

I use a Canon 512xl, and want to try shooting the vision 200t film; would I need to cut a notch for it to be exposed correctly?

I would really appreciate any help, or any links that could help me further understand this topic. Sorry if these are dumb questions, I am very new.
  • 0

#7 Art Leal

Art Leal
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 145 posts
  • Other
  • New York City

Posted 24 August 2008 - 07:00 AM

I am a student, and am a bit confused about the reason for cutting the notch, and am hoping someone could explain the whole thing to me.

I use a Canon 512xl, and want to try shooting the vision 200t film; would I need to cut a notch for it to be exposed correctly?



Try this thread:

http://www.cinematog...showtopic=31149
  • 0

#8 Jim Carlile

Jim Carlile
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 464 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 27 August 2008 - 03:53 PM

With Vision 200T, Kodak supplies the film in a 'daylight' cartridge, which means there is no filter notch. What this does is push in the camera's filter-pin, which both disables the internal 85 filter and sets the meter to a specific ASA speed.

This speed is determined by the speed-notch of the cartridge. Kodak deliberately cuts V200T at ASA 160T/100D. What this means is that with the daylight cartridge, the film will be exposed not at ASA 160 (close to 200) but at ASA 100. They do this on purpose-- they like it this way.

If you cut a notch in the cartridge, the film will be exposed at ASA 160 instead. That's a little closer to ASA 200, and some people prefer it this way.

It's easy to cut a notch-- just score out the area where the filter pin is pushed in, with a knife, then break it off with pliers. The pin will stay out, and the meter will be set to the higher ASA speed.

Not all cameras do this, but the Canons will.

For 500T, Kodak sets up the meter at ASA 250-- the same one-stop overexposed. Same remedy.
  • 0

#9 Art Leal

Art Leal
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 145 posts
  • Other
  • New York City

Posted 28 August 2008 - 01:06 AM

This speed is determined by the speed-notch of the cartridge. Kodak deliberately cuts V200T at ASA 160T/100D. What this means is that with the daylight cartridge, the film will be exposed not at ASA 160 (close to 200) but at ASA 100. They do this on purpose-- they like it this way.



This is correct. On the following photo, you will see the 200T, Ektachrome 160A, and Pro8mm's Pro8/43's 160T Negative all speed notched the same way. The 200T is the only one without a daylight notch.
http://s466.photobuc...rrent=Films.jpg

I've also included the insert that was in the Ektachrome's box. I found it pretty informative, though it's nothing I haven't read about on this great forum. Funny, years ago I wouldn't bother reading this stuff but now I do.
http://s466.photobuc...rrent=Kodak.png

This may be a bit off topic, but along similar lines. The 160T Negative is being touted as being able to be exposed under the same conditions the Ektachrome 160T was. I spoke to someone at Pro8mm and they told me it can be considered an exact replacement. Though this may be true since it's speed notched as the Ektachrome 160, my question is will it expose the same way? One first assistant cameraman I spoke to said whenever he exposed a negative at it's rated ASA, it would come back underexposed, and since then he has always overexposed negative stock with good results.

I will try it by shooting the same scene at the rated ASA and another with a stop's difference. In the interim, I was wondering if anyone would care to advise. Many thanks!
  • 0

#10 Richard Baines

Richard Baines

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts
  • Student

Posted 01 September 2008 - 10:30 PM

An exact replacement for Ektachrome 160T would be simply to push 64T 1 1/3 stops - the grain is the same as the old stock, yet it doesn't have the flat washed out colours the old stock had, the colours on pushed 64T are more like 100D.
  • 0


Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Opal

CineTape

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC

Ritter Battery

CineLab

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

Tai Audio

Technodolly

Abel Cine

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

FJS International, LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

Aerial Filmworks

Visual Products

Opal

Abel Cine

CineLab

Ritter Battery

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Paralinx LLC

The Slider

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

Wooden Camera

Willys Widgets