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1966 Plus-X


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#1 Nick Norton

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Posted 25 August 2008 - 04:22 PM

So i just ran some leader through my Eclair ACL, and everything seems to be working alright.

I am now about to put some actual film through it, but i'll be shooting 100ft. of Plus-K reversal that was supposed to be processed back in 1966. So i was wondering how i should compensate in my exposure for such an old film. Should i rate it slower, or faster? Also, i don't even know what the film is supposed to be rated because there is no indication of the film speed on the box.

Any help would be appreciated-
nicholas
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#2 John Sprung

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Posted 25 August 2008 - 05:21 PM

IIRC, it was ASA 50 back then. If anything, it would get slower. This is just for tests, so bracket some exposures. And if you have mechanical problems, remember that this is old enough that shrinkage may be an issue.



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#3 Ira Ratner

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Posted 27 August 2008 - 05:54 PM

Nicholas, how come you're using 40-plus year old film?

For a certain look?
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#4 Nick Norton

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Posted 27 August 2008 - 06:28 PM

Nicholas, how come you're using 40-plus year old film?

For a certain look?



Originally just as a camera test... but i have actually thought up a use for the look.

Does anyone else have any advice on how i should plan to expose this stock since it is so old?

thanks-
nicholas
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#5 K Borowski

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Posted 27 August 2008 - 08:45 PM

Rate at 12 or less, two stops more exposure. This is neg., right? PRactically no way to develop as reversal without extensive testing.

YOu're still going to have extensive fog and low contrast. Good luck. Do a fog test with a couple of feet first before you waste your time though, OK? After a certain point, film gets fogged out.

Maybe rate at 6.

Here's the dig: shoot a few seconds at EI 3, 6, 12, and 25, hell 50, and send to the lab to process, send film for them to run through without developer, and unexposed film on the end of the footage you shot so they can read base fog. Undeveloped film is for base density. They should be able to tell you a lot from this.

Edited by Karl Borowski, 27 August 2008 - 08:47 PM.

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