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16x9 in super 8


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#1 Ryan Ball

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Posted 29 August 2008 - 02:38 AM

What's the most common way to get 16x9 images with Super 8? Should I file the gate wider or are there better options in post. I've seen quite a bit of vignetting in Max8 footage and would like to avoid that.
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#2 Richard Tuohy

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Posted 29 August 2008 - 04:59 AM

What's the most common way to get 16x9 images with Super 8? Should I file the gate wider or are there better options in post. I've seen quite a bit of vignetting in Max8 footage and would like to avoid that.


Hi Ryan,
As you no doubt know, your choices are:
super-duper 8
anamorphic super 8
crop in post.

The most reliable results that I see are the latter.

It is rarely pointed out that the super 8 frame had to be cropped a little at the sides to fit in the standard video frame. Personally I think the loss of the top-bottom crop is over-stated... its not much more that the side-side loss that occurs in standard video transfers. Yes, its more, but I argue not much more. Of course, if we could readily increase the frame and reliably access non-vignetting lenses and avoid sound-stripe edge scratching, all systematically, then an enlarged picture area is a much better approach. But if that is what you want, shoot super 16 from short ends...
cheers,
richard
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#3 JB Guillot

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Posted 29 August 2008 - 08:18 AM

As Richard said, there aren't many technical solutions.

Depending on your hardware, money and production chain you can make your choice.
- Super-duper8 / Max8 : cameras with enlarged gates. Most of them can't have the objective recentered so there can be some aberrations while shooting on the enlarged side of the gate. Add to this the pro telecine transfert (or you need to find a projector that can turn without a gate or with enlarged gate - problem : optical aberrations...). Probably a good stuff but can be too expensive depending on you projects, and results may not be that good.
- Anamorphic : use of anamorphic lense or optical part to fit a 16:9 pic in a 4:3 gate. Seems to be one of the best solution for shooting 16:9. No optical problem is anamophic lense is correctly set. Problems : finding an anamorphic lense (not always easy and quite a cost !), framing (distorted image in viewfinder), make the anamorphic lense fit your camera lense (can be difficult depending on models, makes the camera bigger and difficult to use with other complements such as wide angles, filters, mattebox...).
- Crop in post : easier thing to do, main point is framing without any guides.

As far as I'm concerned I was planning to shoot anamorphic S8 but things get a lot more complicated with this stuff so I'll crop in post and will still have some great result !
In order to have a correct frame I'll propably use a video tap and check my pictures on a screen with 16:9 markers.

Whatever solution you choose, please share your experience. It seems that not so many people shoot super 8 in 16:9 !
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