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#1 Rick Shepardson

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Posted 31 August 2008 - 06:54 PM

Greetings,
I'm going to be shooting a short film and am considering a few filters. However, I find that company sights rarely show pictoral examples of what each filter does. I would like to have some sort of visual reference when researching the various filters that are available. Does anybody know of a site which displays such examples? Something with before and after pictures would be optimal.
I do have the swatch books for lee and roscoe filters-however, this very helpful to me.
Thanks,
Rick Shepardson
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 31 August 2008 - 07:26 PM

I do have the swatch books for lee and roscoe filters-however, this very helpful to me.
Thanks,
Rick Shepardson


Are you talking about lighting GELS or camera FILTERS?
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#3 Eric Clark

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Posted 31 August 2008 - 07:30 PM

The book "Image Control" showcases the effects of many filters. It may be what you're looking for. The ASC bookstore sells it in some pretty keen package deals.
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 31 August 2008 - 07:52 PM

The trouble with most examples of filters in books, brochures, and webpages, is that a diffusion-type filter has to be pretty strong to show-up in a small photo, which can be misleading if you are shooting for a larger screen. This is why testing is key. Often people use the lightest grades, like a #1/8 Classic Soft, let's say, for a feature film... but if you saw a photo in a book using that filter, it would look unfiltered because it is too subtle at that size. Brochures often have to start out with a much heavier filter than you would probably ever use for a movie.

Plus movement can affect your perception of the filter, plus obviously contrast. This is why final decisions have to be based on personal testing.
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#5 Robert Starling SOC

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Posted 31 August 2008 - 08:04 PM

This is a bit off-the-wall but actually the B&H Photo / Video web site has a very good set of examples online for most Tiffen filters. It's not super high quality but they cover a lot of filters with photo samples of the different gradients and intensity.
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 31 August 2008 - 08:12 PM

Try here:
http://www.camerafilters.co.uk/
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#7 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 12:47 AM

Terrific link! :)
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#8 Rick Shepardson

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 04:00 PM

Try here:
http://www.camerafilters.co.uk/



oops-I should have been more specific. I'm primarily interested in actual filters. I've been told that though the swatch book is for gels, it can give an idea of what the relating filter might look like. This is of course, the filter itself-not the final image.
That is an interesting point about the diffusion filters. I'm going to be doing some camera tests with the filter I choose. However, as I'm running on a tight budget-I want to get some idea of what a filter does before I buy it.
Thanks, and I'll check out the website.
Rick Shepardson
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#9 David Rakoczy

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 04:07 PM

oops-I should have been more specific. I'm primarily interested in actual filters. I've been told that though the swatch book is for gels, it can give an idea of what the relating filter might look like. This is of course, the filter itself-not the final image.
That is an interesting point about the diffusion filters. I'm going to be doing some camera tests with the filter I choose. However, as I'm running on a tight budget-I want to get some idea of what a filter does before I buy it.
Thanks, and I'll check out the website.
Rick Shepardson


Rick, it is still unclear what you are 'actually' talking about.. what do you mean by 'actual' Filters.. they are all 'actual' Filters. Are you talking about a Filter you would put on a Lens... or Light? It would also help if you shared with us exactly 'what' Filter(s) you bought.. are considering buying...

Edited by David Rakoczy, 01 September 2008 - 04:08 PM.

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#10 Rick Shepardson

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 04:11 PM

Try here:
http://www.camerafilters.co.uk/


While I'm here, I should ask the larger question-should I even use a filter?
Regardless of what I use-I'm going to error on the side of safety and use a pale filter. First is the fear of going too far and not being able to reduce the effect in post.
The biggest reason I'm dubious of using a filter is we'll shooting in all daylight exteriors.
I will be doing some tests to find out what color abbirations I might run into. However, because of the budget and procedural restraints of this piece, I'll have to do my tests about three weeks earlier than the shoot. So, I'm not sure what seasonal changes may impact the final image. Because of this, I am afraid that using a filter will only add another variable to an allready complicated situation.
Thanks for any advice,
Rick Shepardson
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#11 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 04:41 PM

Are you aware that lighting gels are not optically clear enough to be used as camera filters? Are you talking about colored filters for a camera or colored gels for lights? What color effect are you trying to achieve? What sort of camera / format are you shooting? How are you posting it?
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#12 Rick Shepardson

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Posted 02 September 2008 - 05:03 PM

Are you aware that lighting gels are not optically clear enough to be used as camera filters? Are you talking about colored filters for a camera or colored gels for lights? What color effect are you trying to achieve? What sort of camera / format are you shooting? How are you posting it?


Sorry again. After getting some sleep, I realize that my posts were fairly scatter brained. Now I can only laugh at my "actual filters" statement.


I'm shooting on super 16mm, kodak 200D.
We will be transfering to Sony HD cam for digital projection.

I'm looking into Camera FX filters for slightly warmer skin tones. The film takes place during a dust bowl era drought. I am striving for a look that is more of a yellow-ish warmth than red. So, I guess it would likely be closer to Straw than an 85 filter. I've researched chocolate, bastard amber, and tobacco. Because there are comedic elements to the piece, I don't want to create such a thick atmosphere that it borederlines claustrophobic. So, it wouldn't be as strong as say, Bound For Glory with all diffusion camera filters and photo flashing. As it's almost all exteriors, I want the sky to remain blue, not some sort of post apocalyptic red.

The plus side is that we're going to have a strong art director. So, we'll be achieving a great deal of the desired effect through production design as opposed to filters and post production effects. I'm just considering weather or not I want to give a little more warmth to skin tones.

In conclusion, I'm looking for a warm and rustic look but not so heavy that the audience is gasping for air.
Thanks,
Rick
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#13 David Rakoczy

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Posted 02 September 2008 - 06:24 PM

Kodak does not make a 200D.. they make a 200T or a 250D.
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#14 Chris Keth

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Posted 02 September 2008 - 06:47 PM

Rick, it sounds to me by your last post that you may be looking for a little help from makeup. Or perhaps a combination of a very light filter to tie everything together visually and somewhat warmer makeup will accomplish what is needed.
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