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Film Stock for Still and Arriflex 16mm


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#1 Jessica Njoo

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 04:54 AM

I am shooting a short film on 16mm in October but am doing some lighting setups prior and taking some stills.

I am used to digital and am only just getting into film now


What is the shutter speed I should use when shooting the stills (on a pentax SLR) to be the same as the 16mm film on Arriflex?


Also are there any tips about what I should be doing when taking the stills?


If these questions seem strange please tell me why, I am a complete amateur when it comes to film!

Thanks,

Jess
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#2 David Auner aac

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 08:00 AM

What is the shutter speed I should use when shooting the stills (on a pentax SLR) to be the same as the 16mm film on Arriflex?


Hi Jess,

you best get a couple of basic film and cinematography books (check out the recommended books section of the boards). Also read the manual of your camera if you have one. The shutter speed for 24fps and a 180degree shutter is 1/48th second. round that up to 1/50th and you're set with most still cameras. Welcome to the film world and have fun shooting film!

Regards, Dave
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#3 Ira Ratner

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 08:56 AM

With still, you can adjust both the shutter speed and aperture (lens opening) to get the correct exposure.

In other words, if your meter indicates correct exposure at 1/125 shutter speed at an F5.6 aperture, it will ALSO be correct at 1/60 at F8. 1/60 leaves the shutter open twice as long as 1/125, and believe it or not, F8 lets in HALF as much light as F5.6.

Yeah, numerically, 5.6 to 8 doesn't appear doubled or halved, but it is. Each setting on your lens is called a "stop," and going from your smallest number to larger, each subsequent one lets in half as much light.

2.8 lets in twice as much light 4, 4 lets in twice as much as 5.6, etc.

There are differences in depth of field though in the aperture you work with. The larger the number (which lets in less light)--gives you more area in front of and behind your main subject which will appear in focus. So depending on what you want in focus will determine your combination of aperture and shutter speed.

Your still camera may have a depth of field preview button, which is fantastic. Once you're metered correctly, you push the button to preview your depth of field. So often, you'll make your correct settings, preview the depth of field, and then change your aperture and shutter speed to better match the look you're going after.

For example, for a butterfly on a flower, you want the butterfly and that flower to stand out from all of the shrubbery that may be visible behind it, so you would want to use a narrow depth of field like 1.8, 2.8, etc.

With movie camera work, you have no choices. Your shutter speed is determined by the fact that you're shooting at the standard 24 frames per second, so the only thing you can adjust for correct exposure is the aperture. However, you can still play with your depth of field options by using neutral density filters, which reduce the amount of light entering the lens.

So only two things affect exposure for both still and movie:

The size of the lens opening, and the amount of time it stays open.

And you know that different films have different sensitivities, correct? Or maybe not, so when you load your film, you have to set the meter to the film's ASA/ISO number so it knows what to do for that particular film's sensitivity. And no difference between black and white and color, except for color temperature, which you don't have to know this second.
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#4 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 11:30 PM

Hi Jessica.

What model Arriflex will you be using?
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