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Incoming Novice Question--What's That Thing Called?


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#1 Ira Ratner

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Posted 06 September 2008 - 09:27 AM

Or IS there such a thing:

Let's say I'm driving by a strip club with an open window that gives you a great view of the stage. I park the car, walk around, and find the best place to set up the K-3 so no one will catch me when I start shooting the next day.

Is there a device or technique that I can use/utilize that will help me determine the focal length I'm going to want to use from that camera position, so I don't have to shlep the entire lens arsenal, and also give me a better idea on which stock I should be thinking about using?

As an amateur, I'm of course aware of the framing-a-scene-with-your-fingers gag, but is there a scope that actually does this? If so, my guess is that it would be a simple spotting scope, with different field of views just etched into the finder.

And as mentioned, I need it for 16mm.
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 06 September 2008 - 11:18 AM

It's called a directors viewfinder.
Some take PL lenses so you can bring your lens and see how it'll look, some are just variable with equivalents, and they're pretty cheap.

http://www.google.co...m...=1&ct=title
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#3 Ira Ratner

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Posted 06 September 2008 - 02:24 PM

Thank YOU!!!

Posting here is so much easier than having to read books.
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#4 Ira Ratner

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Posted 06 September 2008 - 02:50 PM

$200 ain't that cheap in my universe:

http://www.bhphotovi...iewfinder_.html

But how come it says it can be used for 16mm, but a reviewer says no 16mm?
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#5 Allen Achterberg

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Posted 06 September 2008 - 05:12 PM

and if you dont want to spend a lot of money, You can always refer to Field of Few Charts in the ASC Manual or find them online.
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#6 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 06 September 2008 - 05:21 PM

Well compared to other things. .. it can be pretty cheap in the film universe, but I know how you feel. I've never used that specific finder, but if it just has 35mm you can extrapolate 16mm (approx). I forget the exact formula for it, but it's there.
I usually err towards the Mark VB I believe is the name of it. I don't use it always, but it has come out with me from time to time. I find a DSLR much more useful these days and I approximate.
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#7 Ira Ratner

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Posted 07 September 2008 - 06:07 PM

Thanks, guys.

I basically just want something with me/in the car at all times to use when the urge strikes--or to possess the knowledge to figure it out without any specific tool.

But since I'm both poor and stupid, I'm out of luck.
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#8 Allen Achterberg

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Posted 07 September 2008 - 11:49 PM

No! dont give up like that. I dont see why you cant just throw some general glass on the K3 and find out what you need. worse case, take a few lenses that you think you'd need and project them into a piece of diffusion. that way you dont need the k3. very easy to do, just handhold it. should give you a very good estimate. But is the K3 that big?

generalize your filmstock down too. what sort of weather will you have? use 250D, that is very versitile stuff. so is the 200t or 100t, or if you are going fuji try the 160t, or 250t. basically, this all comes with experience. just spend more time with your gear and your light meter. learn to tune yourself in with both.
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#9 Allen Achterberg

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Posted 07 September 2008 - 11:55 PM

dont forget common sense. if you think you'll need longer lenses, look at the longer. put those in their own smaller case. same goes for wide-medium lenses. why not just take out a zoom and get as close to you can the shot you want...
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Aerial Filmworks

FJS International, LLC

Abel Cine

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies