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Brown filtering; Sepia, Tobacco, etc.


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#1 Antonio Cisneros

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Posted 06 September 2008 - 09:12 PM

Hey All

I have a job in a month and it's set in 1930's in the fields of Delaware. To establish this feel I want to use some type of a brown filtering; Sepia, Tobacco, etc. Does anyone have recommendations of any type or brands to use? Or any other kind of filters that could possibly work?

Originally I was going to use an orange color but now darker earth tone is really what the film needs. Any thoughts?

Thanks
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#2 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 07 September 2008 - 03:59 AM

Well The Godfather used a lot of yellow light which then many period films afterward emulated for years, you might try testing that. Tiffen is pretty much the industry workhorse so I'd probably go with them. As far as type, that's gonna be up to you because only you know what your movie should look like and each "type" will give you a variant so you have to decide what look you want. Filters will have varying increments of filtering strength so once you've decided which filter to use, then you'll need to decide how strong you want that filter to be which will in turn effect the camera setting but, of course how, how you light the frame and gels you use will also play a major part, perhaps the most important part in the look of your film so that will be one of the first things to factor in as well as the set and costume colors and design, so you see there are a LOT of things to consider when deciding how to create the "look" of a film.
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#3 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 07 September 2008 - 04:51 AM

You should try Tiffen's Antique Suede - I prefer them to tobacco as they have a slightly more sepia tone.
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#4 Antonio Cisneros

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Posted 07 September 2008 - 09:12 AM

You should try Tiffen's Antique Suede - I prefer them to tobacco as they have a slightly more sepia tone.



Thanks.
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#5 Ira Ratner

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Posted 07 September 2008 - 09:26 AM

Are you shooting film or video?
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#6 Antonio Cisneros

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Posted 07 September 2008 - 04:57 PM

Are you shooting film or video?


7201 & 7205.
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#7 timHealy

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Posted 07 September 2008 - 05:03 PM

Also how will you be doing your post?

If you are you a DI you may want to expose normal and add color later.

One job I worked on shifted from using a Tobacco or Tobacco like filter during its first several seasons and then left it to the post guys to do.

Most Colorists would prefer the DP don't do anything that limits what they can do in the post house. But that is the subject for another thread.

Best

Tim
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Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

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