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canon 310 xl with 64t film


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#1 monchacha

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Posted 08 September 2008 - 06:59 AM

Hi I am new to the super 8 world. I got a canon 310 xl and kodak ejtachrome 64t film recently but only to find later from the internet that the camera won't read the 64t film properly.

There is no exposure compensation option in the camera, neither can I adjust the aperture/shutter speed so I wonder if there's any way to expose correctly indoor and outdoor with that camera? Is there anything I can do about it? What will happen if I just shoot the film as is in daylight and tungsten condition?

I got a friend's wedding to shoot this week and will appreciate anyone's help in giving me a clue as in how to go about shooting with this camera and film combination. Thanks a lot in advance.
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#2 andy oliver

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Posted 08 September 2008 - 08:16 AM

Hi, only possible solution is an nd filter on the lens, trouble is you wont find an nd filter, 43mm diameter i think, that knocks off a third of a stop!!!. Assume you have the non auto focus model??.. Where are you located in the world?? I have found for some weird reason that the canon 318m delivers ok results with 64t, sharper and not so over exposed compared to the 310, perhaps if you can quickly source a 318m. Trouble is is really need a known working camera for a wedding shoot...
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#3 andy oliver

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Posted 08 September 2008 - 08:17 AM

Possible solution is to shoot fuji 50d either from Spectra or wittner, no guarantee of image stability though, least exposure will be nearer the mark!!

Edited by andy oliver, 08 September 2008 - 08:19 AM.

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#4 Richard Tuohy

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Posted 08 September 2008 - 06:49 PM

Hi I am new to the super 8 world. I got a canon 310 xl and kodak ejtachrome 64t film recently but only to find later from the internet that the camera won't read the 64t film properly.

There is no exposure compensation option in the camera, neither can I adjust the aperture/shutter speed so I wonder if there's any way to expose correctly indoor and outdoor with that camera? Is there anything I can do about it? What will happen if I just shoot the film as is in daylight and tungsten condition?

I got a friend's wedding to shoot this week and will appreciate anyone's help in giving me a clue as in how to go about shooting with this camera and film combination. Thanks a lot in advance.



Hi there monchacha,
There are two alternatives you can do to shoot 64t in this camera. All this of course assumes that the camera is working as it was intended. Do remember that this is an old camera and the light meter may have drifted anyway. But here goes:
With this camera the light isn't metered through the lens but through its own light meter 'lens'. This is useful. Also, this camera will usually read 64t as 160 rather than 40. One option you have is to block the asa notch on the cartridge such that the camera will detect this film as 40 asa. The asa notch is the larger notch on the cartridge. It can be blocked with a piece of tape with a ball of paper etc behind it. So now the camera will think the film is 40. Actually the film is 64. Because the light meter is separate from the lens (ie is not a TTL light meter) you can put a 2/3rd stop ND filter on the lens. A 2/3rd stop nd is often called a '.2 nd'. This will effectively result in a speed reduction of your film to 40. This means you are in business. If you can't get a 2/3rd ND filter, you can use an 85b (or c) filter (which is orange in colour) and switch the camera's filter to 'tungsten' (bulb). This won't work for shooting indoors though.

The second option is to put a 1 and 2/3rd ND filter on the light meter lens. A 1 and 2/3rd stop ND filter is often called a '.5 ND'. With a filter on the light meter lens, the amount of light is reduced to the sensor, so the meter reads more 'open' which is what you need.

Both these options involve buying extra filters. You could just do the asa block trick with the tape such that the camera believes the film is 40 and shoot with a 2/3rd stop over exposure.

good luck with it,
richard
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#5 monchacha

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Posted 09 September 2008 - 08:04 AM

Many thanks for the info and ideas above. I bought the camera in Sydney but I've relocated to China recently and there's no camera shop that sells 8mm related stuff here, neither do filters of super 8 camera's size. So most likely I have to take the modifying-notch option that Richard suggested above. There are two notches and I wonder if the asa notch is the upper one, and do I just stuff the upper notch/hole with paper and put tape on the cartridge on the side followed by inserting the film into the camera? Also, does that work with both daylight and tungsten? (sorry if my questions sound stupid as I am a total beginner who hasn't filmed anything super 8 yet). Thanks so much again.
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#6 Richard Tuohy

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Posted 09 September 2008 - 07:05 PM

Many thanks for the info and ideas above. I bought the camera in Sydney but I've relocated to China recently and there's no camera shop that sells 8mm related stuff here, neither do filters of super 8 camera's size. So most likely I have to take the modifying-notch option that Richard suggested above. There are two notches and I wonder if the asa notch is the upper one, and do I just stuff the upper notch/hole with paper and put tape on the cartridge on the side followed by inserting the film into the camera? Also, does that work with both daylight and tungsten? (sorry if my questions sound stupid as I am a total beginner who hasn't filmed anything super 8 yet). Thanks so much again.


hi monchacha,
the speed notch is indeed the largest notch, which is the upper notch. Take a look inside the camera where this notch would go if you inserted a cartridge. Where the notch would line up you will see two little pins that can be pushed in. These are the asa (film speed) detecting pins. The outcome you want is for all the asa pins to be pushed in. This is 40 asa tungsten 25 asa daylight. So block that speed notch with somehting (perhaps a ball of paper ... some of my customers who smoke use cigarette filters) and put a piece of electrical tape over the notch (to make the face of the cartridge smooth). It is probably the case the tape alone would do the job, but I prefer the tape supported by something like paper.
Yes, this works with daylight and tungsten. You haven't affected the so called 'filter' notch which is the lower notch on the cartridge so the camera's filter works as normal. I think the 310 might have a filter switch on the outside of the camera for switching between daylight and tungsten. If so, use that as intended. If it doesnt' have such a switch, it will need either a 'filter screw' or a 'filter key' ... ask about that if you need to.
How many rolls are you going to shoot? If its 2 or so, why not send them down to me (nano lab) for 'pull' processing to 40 asa? If the camera is working properly, then this will give a normal result. But it is a big IF of course... You might just have them processed as 64 as the results shouldn't be too far wrong.
good luck,
richard
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