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Bell & Howell Filmo 70-DR


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#1 Dave Lasayko

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Posted 12 September 2008 - 02:17 PM

Hi,
Hope Someone Can Answer My Question. I Just Got A B & H Filmo 70-DR Off EBAY. Camera Is In Excellent Condition. Everything Appears To Be In Premium Operating Order. I Cannot Move The Exposure Dial At All. I Removed It From The Slider Arm And Lubricated The Inside Of The Dial After I Took Off The Two Front Screws And Removed The Front Disc With The Speed Markings On It.
The Exposure Bar Moves Back And Forth Inside The Camera But However I Try To Turn The Knurled Outer Rim Of The Adjustment Wheel, It Will Not Budge!. The Dial Appears To Be "Locked" On 16 exp/sec. My Question is, Did Bell & Howell Make A 70-DR With A Fixed Exposure Dial That Could Not Be Changed By Turning The Outer Knurled Dial. With The Dial In My Hand Out Of The Camera, I Don't See How This Wheel Would Be Alowed To Turn. It All Looks Like One Piece. Am I Missing Something Here? I Could Use A Little Help.
Thanks!

Dave
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#2 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 12 September 2008 - 07:17 PM

Hi,
Hope Someone Can Answer My Question. I Just Got A B & H Filmo 70-DR Off EBAY. Camera Is In Excellent Condition. Everything Appears To Be In Premium Operating Order. I Cannot Move The Exposure Dial At All.

The dial adjusts the govener inside the camera. The govenor linkage may be bent. or the govenoer may be damaged. Does the Camera actually run at 16FPS? (load it with some leader or scap film and give it a 10 second timed run marking the film with the location of the gate before and after.and measure the space on the film. (40 frames to the foot).

You do know that the manual sugests replecing that knob with a new one every time the Camera is dismantled. The tech is suposed to use a blade to make the scratch marks that show the exact settings.
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#3 Dave Lasayko

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Posted 12 September 2008 - 08:12 PM

The dial adjusts the govener inside the camera. The govenor linkage may be bent. or the govenoer may be damaged. Does the Camera actually run at 16FPS? (load it with some leader or scap film and give it a 10 second timed run marking the film with the location of the gate before and after.and measure the space on the film. (40 frames to the foot).

You do know that the manual sugests replecing that knob with a new one every time the Camera is dismantled. The tech is suposed to use a blade to make the scratch marks that show the exact settings.


Thanks Charles.
I know that the govenor linkage moves freely only after the knob is removed from the linkage. The outer knurled knob is supposed to move around the inner disc that has the markings on it for the speeds. It does not. It appears to be one solid piece.
I'm not a camera expert by any means but I am very mechanically inclined and I see no way that this knob can rotate and move the govenor slider arm linkage unless you turn the whole knob by loosening the screw on the linkage from inside the camera housing. The outer knurled knob has to be able to rotate around the inner marked section because the shaft is secured by a forked clip that will not allow it to turn. Did B & H install fixed 16 exp/sec knobs on some 70-DR models that could not be changed?
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#4 Charlie Peich

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Posted 12 September 2008 - 10:07 PM

Dave,

I had this happen on a couple of Filmo 70s I picked up over the years. You are very close to solving your problem. I'm glad you didn't try to force the Speed control knob with pliers.

Please refer to drawing below!

When disassembled, Speed Control Knob #20 should rotate freely around Speed Control Dial Holder #19. Prior to the DR model, Retaining Spring Screw #16 held Speed Control Retaining Spring #15, #19 and #20 together. With the DR model they used a rivet pin to hold #15, 19 and 20 together. This makes it hard to disassemble #19 and 20! You could knock the pin out, but don't do that yet.

What has happened is #19 and #20 have corroded together! 2 different metal materials. What I did was, I soaked the speed control knob assembly in penetrating oil (liquid wrench, WD-40 or a degreaser - it won't hurt the paint on #20) for a day or so, and it started moving. Now that you know how it works, you'll be able to hold #19 with your fingers and try and move knob #20. Blow it out with compressed air. Don't put anything in the screw holes on #19, they damage easily. Be patient, it may take a longer soaking.

If soaking doesn't work, you'll have to knock the pin out, then you'll be able to separate #19 and #20.

Reassemble and shoot!

B&H did not lock any of the 8 - 64fps 70 series to a specific frame rate that I'm aware of. If they did, they wouldn't have the dial. The 128 fps only model has a plate over the hole where the speed dial goes, but that's the only model I've seen that on. There was a lock assembly on the speed dial, but I think that was on the Eyemo only.

As for "remarking" the Governor Dial #17, Charles is correct that the speed needs to be re-calibrated when the camera is disassembled and repairs are performed, or opening the camera and adjusting/repairing the governor. I re-assembled my camera's speed control knob using the same #17 and the speeds came up as marked from the factory, but, I only took apart the speed control knob like you are doing. However, these cameras are old, and if it has been sitting unused for awhile, the speeds may be off. I used a strobe light to check mine.

Let me know if this works for you.

Charlie



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#5 Charlie Peich

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Posted 12 September 2008 - 10:19 PM

Dave,

I had this happen on a couple of Filmo 70s I picked up over the years. You are very close to solving your problem. I'm glad you didn't try to force the Speed control knob with pliers.

Please refer to drawing below!

When disassembled, Speed Control Knob #20 should rotate freely around Speed Control Dial Holder #19. Prior to the DR model, Retaining Spring Screw #16 held Speed Control Retaining Spring #15, #19 and #20 together. With the DR model they used a rivet pin to hold #15, 19 and 20 together. This makes it hard to disassemble #19 and 20! You could knock the pin out, but don't do that yet.

What has happened is #19 and #20 have corroded together! 2 different metal materials. What I did was, I soaked the speed control knob assembly in penetrating oil (liquid wrench, WD-40 or a degreaser - it won't hurt the paint on #20) for a day or so, and it started moving. Now that you know how it works, you'll be able to hold #19 with your fingers and try and move knob #20. Blow it out with compressed air. Don't put anything in the screw holes on #19, they damage easily. Be patient, it may take a longer soaking.

If soaking doesn't work, you'll have to knock the pin out, then you'll be able to separate #19 and #20.

Reassemble and shoot!

B&H did not lock any of the 8 - 64fps 70 series to a specific frame rate that I'm aware of. If they did, they wouldn't have the dial. The 128 fps only model has a plate over the hole where the speed dial goes, but that's the only model I've seen that on. There was a lock assembly on the speed dial, but I think that was on the Eyemo only.

As for "remarking" the Governor Dial #17, Charles is correct that the speed needs to be re-calibrated when the camera is disassembled and repairs are performed, or opening the camera and adjusting/repairing the governor. I re-assembled my camera's speed control knob using the same #17 and the speeds came up as marked from the factory, but, I only took apart the speed control knob like you are doing. However, these cameras are old, and if it has been sitting unused for awhile, the speeds may be off. I used a strobe light to check mine.

Let me know if this works for you.

Charlie



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Dave,

I forgot to say, take the 2 Governor Dial Screws #18 out and remove the Governor Dial #17 1st. Leave this off until you get #19 and # 20 working.

I know you knew that.
Charlie
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#6 Dave Lasayko

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Posted 13 September 2008 - 07:44 AM

Dave,

I forgot to say, take the 2 Governor Dial Screws #18 out and remove the Governor Dial #17 1st. Leave this off until you get #19 and # 20 working.

I know you knew that.
Charlie





Thank You Charlie!!!

It all makes perfect sense now. I knew in the back of my mind that the dial was made to be adjusted because of how it was set up inside the camera. My first instinct was that the dial was stuck or gummed up but figured it would be able to lossened with minimal effort. I thought about using plyers cusioned with a rag but knew that would probably end up a disaster. I'm going to soak the assembly like you suggest and am confident now that I will have success even if I have to knock the pin out. I guess what you don't know can hurt you! I did take Charles advice too and marked the govenor linkage posistion as I originally found it so I can match it up to the original mark it was set to on the speed dial. I will let you know how I make out Charlie and thank you so much for taking the time to help me out with the diagrams and all. Much appreciated!

Dave
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Aerial Filmworks

Abel Cine

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Ritter Battery

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Metropolis Post

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

FJS International, LLC

Opal

Willys Widgets

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