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Bleeding reds, where does it happen?


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#1 Ryan Patrick OHara

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Posted 14 September 2008 - 12:55 AM

Hello everybody, I apologize if this is a noob question:

I am writing a small article (for personal reasons, not an actual publication) about shooting 35mm film stocks.

I am currently exploring black and white stocks, and while I was writing, thought of a really interesting question.

I know in film and in video, vivid reds have a tendency to bleed and can give the illusion of being slightly soft/out of focus. What I do not know is where this effect happens. It's either an optical bleeding which would be through the lens, or it's a reaction in the red layer of film emulsions.

If it happens in the film emulsion, would it be faulty logic to then think black and white film stocks are impervious to bleeding reds? I would certainly like to run tests and answer some of my own questions, but I lack the resources at the moment.

Thank you for your time,
-Ryan
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 14 September 2008 - 02:30 AM

Hi,

The Red layer of film is soft, often overlooked by people shooting digital trying to get a film look.

Stephen.

Hello everybody, I apologize if this is a noob question:

I am writing a small article (for personal reasons, not an actual publication) about shooting 35mm film stocks.

I am currently exploring black and white stocks, and while I was writing, thought of a really interesting question.

I know in film and in video, vivid reds have a tendency to bleed and can give the illusion of being slightly soft/out of focus. What I do not know is where this effect happens. It's either an optical bleeding which would be through the lens, or it's a reaction in the red layer of film emulsions.

If it happens in the film emulsion, would it be faulty logic to then think black and white film stocks are impervious to bleeding reds? I would certainly like to run tests and answer some of my own questions, but I lack the resources at the moment.

Thank you for your time,
-Ryan


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#3 Ryan Patrick OHara

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Posted 14 September 2008 - 02:38 AM

Hi,

The Red layer of film is soft, often overlooked by people shooting digital trying to get a film look.

Stephen.


Ah, so the red bleeding is not the result of red wavelengths of light through the lens, but rather originates in the emulsion?

In that case, may I make the statement that black and white film stock, when filming a very bright vivid red object, will not suffer from tonal bleeding?
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#4 Clément Brewer

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Posted 14 September 2008 - 08:50 AM

You should check out this post
http://www.cinematog...n...c=25686&hl=

It explains red appears soft because it's the last layer of a film sotck : light is diffused by the blue and green layers before exposing the red one.

Edited by Clément Brewer, 14 September 2008 - 08:50 AM.

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Gamma Ray Digital Inc

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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Willys Widgets

FJS International, LLC

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