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Learning to use a film camera


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#1 Salil Sundresh

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Posted 18 September 2008 - 04:00 AM

I've been shooting on 24p video since I started making and working on movies. I've learned a lot about lighting, how to meter, frame, pull focus on DOF adapter, choosing the right lense etc. But I've never really had the opportunity to work with a motion picture film camera, is there anywhere (besides of course on a film set) I can learn a about the technical basics that I should know when using a film camera? (16mm or 35mm)

Edited by Salil Sundresh, 18 September 2008 - 04:05 AM.

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#2 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 18 September 2008 - 04:24 AM

I've been shooting on 24p video since I started making and working on movies. I've learned a lot about lighting, how to meter, frame, pull focus on DOF adapter, choosing the right lense etc. But I've never really had the opportunity to work with a motion picture film camera, is there anywhere (besides of course on a film set) I can learn a about the technical basics that I should know when using a film camera? (16mm or 35mm)



There are a number of workshops eg the International Film Workshops that you could attend. One of the camera assistant workshops would be a good starting point.

Otherwise you could contact a rental house, explain what you wish to do and they may allow you to practise on their kit. You can download quite a few camera manuals, but even if attending a workshop I'd buy a few books so you can learn the correct procedures.
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#3 Salil Sundresh

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Posted 18 September 2008 - 05:24 AM

There are a number of workshops eg the International Film Workshops that you could attend. One of the camera assistant workshops would be a good starting point.

Otherwise you could contact a rental house, explain what you wish to do and they may allow you to practise on their kit. You can download quite a few camera manuals, but even if attending a workshop I'd buy a few books so you can learn the correct procedures.

Thanks for the reply Brian. Are there any specifics books you might recommend?
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#4 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 18 September 2008 - 07:41 AM

Thanks for the reply Brian. Are there any specifics books you might recommend?


Good morning, Salil!

I've assembled a list of the better Camera/filmmaking books at www.whatireallywanttodo.com. Just click on "Additional Resources" and scroll toward the bottom of the page and look for the "Camera" section.

The best thing to do, though, is to visit rental houses and just tell them that you'd like to become more familiar with the equipment. If they have some available and have time, they'll usually be more than happy to pull bodies, lenses, and accessories out and will help show you how to put it all together.
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rebotnix Technologies

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Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

Metropolis Post

Technodolly

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

FJS International, LLC

Wooden Camera

The Slider

Visual Products

Paralinx LLC