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plus x negative 16mm


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#1 DaNiElE BeLArDo

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Posted 19 September 2008 - 03:49 AM

hello people what do you think about this film ?? i have bought 120 meter for my 16mm short...
could you suggest me some tip and tricks??


thanks
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#2 Simon Wyss

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Posted 19 September 2008 - 04:25 AM

Ciao, Daniele

PXN is already an oldtimer, it's got major redesign in 1957. Since then almost unchanged with the exception of more hardened gelatines and small chemical things.

You will have black-and-white pictures like everyone is used to. PXN is a money maker for EKC. Don't think they sell a bad product for so long time. Expose it exactly to ISO 80, have your lab people developed it with care, and your negative will yield fine positives. If you plan to scan I'd suggest to ask the lab manager for fine-grain treatment (different developer recipe). On the other hand you shoot only 400 foot. They might smile at you and not change anything.

Ah, yes, black and white is contrasts.
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#3 Chris Burke

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 08:08 AM

Ciao, Daniele

PXN is already an oldtimer, it's got major redesign in 1957. Since then almost unchanged with the exception of more hardened gelatines and small chemical things.

You will have black-and-white pictures like everyone is used to. PXN is a money maker for EKC. Don't think they sell a bad product for so long time. Expose it exactly to ISO 80, have your lab people developed it with care, and your negative will yield fine positives. If you plan to scan I'd suggest to ask the lab manager for fine-grain treatment (different developer recipe). On the other hand you shoot only 400 foot. They might smile at you and not change anything.

Ah, yes, black and white is contrasts.



Does a black and white negative like 7231 benefit from overexposure? Like color negative, a half to whole stop over?

chris
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#4 Dirk DeJonghe

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 10:11 AM

I have found that most B&W negatives are slower than what it says on the tin by about 2/3 of a stop at least. This was confirmed with sensito exchanges with CTP at Kodak Chalons. We processed our and their sensitometric strips and they processed our and their sensitos too.

The film speed can be easily established with the method on my website (look under downloads) since it tests the stock, your lens and exposure meter and our processing in one easy step. The test is based on Ansel Adams' methods and has been used for generations.

Once you have the correct film speed for your setup, there is no advantage in overexposing B&W negatives, the grain increases with overexposure unlike color negative film.
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