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split focus shot


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#1 pierre salloum

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Posted 24 September 2008 - 08:29 AM

Hey all
How do we get an image with split focus (area in focus and areas out of focus).
Apart from the depth of field thing, can we use some sort of lens (split diopter, or ??)
Can we play with vaseline on a clear lens to achieve such an FX.
Thanks
Pierre
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#2 Tim Terner

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Posted 24 September 2008 - 09:29 AM

Have a look at the lensbaby http://lensbaby.com/gallery-photo.php
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#3 Chris Keth

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Posted 25 September 2008 - 03:20 AM

I would steer clear of lensbabies, personally. The simple meniscus lenses in those things just aren't very good quality. They're fun to play with but they don't have much of a place when you don't want to call attention to the process of making the film.

The theory does hold up, though. You can use a tilt/shift lens to do the effect. It's a lens that is designed to be able to tilt in relation to the film plane. When you do this, the plane of focus tilts as well following what is called the Scheimpflug Rule. You can google that to find out more about it.

The other option is a split diopter. The problem with diopters is that you have to hide the lines between the clear part and the diopter part. That is very easy for some shots, not to easy for others.

Edited by Chris Keth, 25 September 2008 - 03:21 AM.

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#4 pierre salloum

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Posted 25 September 2008 - 08:41 AM

Thanks for the infos. Tilt/shift looks like the lens I need.
Thanks again.

I would steer clear of lensbabies, personally. The simple meniscus lenses in those things just aren't very good quality. They're fun to play with but they don't have much of a place when you don't want to call attention to the process of making the film.

The theory does hold up, though. You can use a tilt/shift lens to do the effect. It's a lens that is designed to be able to tilt in relation to the film plane. When you do this, the plane of focus tilts as well following what is called the Scheimpflug Rule. You can google that to find out more about it.

The other option is a split diopter. The problem with diopters is that you have to hide the lines between the clear part and the diopter part. That is very easy for some shots, not to easy for others.


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#5 Chris Keth

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Posted 25 September 2008 - 06:00 PM

Thanks for the infos. Tilt/shift looks like the lens I need.
Thanks again.


That's most likely what will work the best for most shots. You don't have to worry about hiding the line of a split diopter. Just remember when you use them that the line of focus can sometimes extend out quite far. You may have to rearrange some set stuff and background talent to make it look as natural as possible.
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#6 Allen Achterberg

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Posted 25 September 2008 - 10:46 PM

The Lens baby is a fine tool with fair quality. It will get the effect you want economically
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