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Share your Vision II filming experiences here...Was your camera's meter actually able to mess up the exposure?


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#1 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 26 September 2008 - 03:38 AM

Has anybody actually had either way overexposed or way underexposed Vision negative film because their super-8 cameras auto exposure meter could not properly compensate the ASA of the negative vision film stock correctly?

Or was the latitude of the negative stocks so good that even if one was off two f-stops overexposed the results were still acceptable?
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#2 Giles Perkins

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Posted 26 September 2008 - 01:08 PM

No problems at all with Canon 814 XLS and a 514XLS - latitude seems to cover a multitude of sins!!
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#3 Ryan Ball

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Posted 26 September 2008 - 01:17 PM

Has anybody actually had either way overexposed or way underexposed Vision negative film because their super-8 cameras auto exposure meter could not properly compensate the ASA of the negative vision film stock correctly?

Or was the latitude of the negative stocks so good that even if one was off two f-stops overexposed the results were still acceptable?



I recently shot neg stock (500T, 200T) for the first time and was really surprised with the results. My Elmo Super 106 auto exposes up to 250 ASA, so I had to compensate with the manual exposure when using 500T. I even overexposes a couple shots intentionally to get a blown-out look. It seems pretty hard to get an unusable image with these stocks, as long as you have decent light. I was also blown asay by the rock-steady registration. I thought the negative stocks were supposed to cause more weave. I'm really in love with these stocks. Now bring on the Vision 3!
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#4 Jim Carlile

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Posted 28 September 2008 - 04:51 AM

No problems at all with Canon 814 XLS and a 514XLS - latitude seems to cover a multitude of sins!!


Was there a difference between the two? The 1014XLS will read up to ASA 400, which gives it a one-stop overexposure with the notchless cartridge, but the 514 only reads to ASA 250, which sets the meter at ASA 160, almost two-stops off.

Did you use the standard auto-exposure, or cut a notch, use manual override, whatever? The results I've seen show that one-stop overexposure works better than dead-on accuracy.
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#5 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 29 September 2008 - 11:28 AM

Was there a difference between the two? The 1014XLS will read up to ASA 400, which gives it a one-stop overexposure with the notchless cartridge, but the 514 only reads to ASA 250, which sets the meter at ASA 160, almost two-stops off.

Did you use the standard auto-exposure, or cut a notch, use manual override, whatever? The results I've seen show that one-stop overexposure works better than dead-on accuracy.


A 400 ASA setting is not considered (1) f-stop overexposure for Vision 500. That would actually be around 1/3 of a stop overexposure. ASA 160 would be about 1 & 2/3 stops overexposure. Indoors that may be acceptable if one is shooting wide open anyways, and for exteriors if the 85 filter is being used, then that would bring one back to within (1) f-stop overexposure.

Although I am not sure if the 85 filter is engaged when outdoors because of the type of cartridge the Vision stocks are using.
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#6 Jim Carlile

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Posted 03 October 2008 - 04:44 AM

Kodak notches their V500 film so that it is treated like ASA 250, which is one-stop overexposed. They do this by speed-notching the cartridge at ASA 400, and then using the 'daylight' cartridge to kick the reading open about 2/3 of a stop, to ASA 250.

V200 is speed-notched at ASA 160, and the daylight cartridge kicks the meter open the same, to read the film at ASA 100-- which is one-stop overexposed from ASA 200.

In both cases the internal 85 filter is disabled, because there is no filter notch in the cartridge. With the camera's filter pin pushed in, the filter can't be placed into the light path. At the same time, the meter opens up 2/3 of a stop, to gain that ASA difference.

But I think the question is-- does any of it make a real difference to these films?
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