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Shooting models (not the female kind!)


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#1 Serge Teulon

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Posted 30 September 2008 - 06:06 AM

Hi Guys,

I've got a 35mm project coming up that includes shooting a model of some terraced houses.
I haven't shot models before.
I'm going to select a small focal length lens but I'm wondering if there are any potential optical problems that I'm not aware of when shooting that scale.

Thanks for your time.

Cheers

Edited by Serge Teulon, 30 September 2008 - 06:07 AM.

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#2 Mike Simpson

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Posted 30 September 2008 - 02:21 PM

The AC manual has a good section on shooting models.
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#3 Serge Teulon

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Posted 30 September 2008 - 02:39 PM

I had a read and it doesn't really point out any pitfalls
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#4 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 30 September 2008 - 10:20 PM

I had a read and it doesn't really point out any pitfalls


There used to be a number of Kodak manuals for lighting and composition that were put out in the 80's. I have some still kicking around. One of them deals with the subject you are wondering about, The Art of Portraits and the Nude, with many examples to illustrate the text.

Here, I found them: The Kodak Library of Creative Photography.

http://www.volumelis.....e Photography

Some of them go for $0.01 on Amazon!!!!! The texts are informative and the pictures beautiful. Something to think about.
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#5 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 30 September 2008 - 11:21 PM

There are also the very cheap and informative Kodak Workshop Series books, also available through Amazon and similar outlets. These latter kind were definitely oriented towards the more advanced photography enthusiast, but like the former book kind -in my previous post- there is a wealth of info to be tapped for next to nothing . . .

Definitely worth a look.

Edited by Saul Rodgar, 30 September 2008 - 11:24 PM.

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#6 Serge Teulon

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Posted 01 October 2008 - 04:01 AM

Thanks Saul ;)
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#7 Delorme Jean-Marie

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Posted 01 October 2008 - 01:41 PM

your main problem will be the depth of field as you film with wide lens to be close choose CF ones "close focus"
the you will have a verry small depth of field and possibly the shadow of the lens.

choose a verry high stop like 16 or 22
light with a strong and focused projector something like a jocker with an optical nose so you can cut the light easely on your lens.

it's gonna be hot on your model ;)
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#8 Serge Teulon

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Posted 02 October 2008 - 04:46 AM

Merci Delorme ;)
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Technodolly

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