Jump to content


Photo

Job search in the US


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Juan Pablo Ramirez

Juan Pablo Ramirez
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 20 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Buenos Aires

Posted 30 September 2008 - 11:17 AM

So i wanted to know, im a young DP, i've done mostly cheap short films (film and video) and one or two commercials, and i've worked also as a 1st and 2nd AC, i want to work in LA or NY, im not located in the US (actually i'm in Buenos Aires, Argentina), what would be the best possible way to find work in the US, with today current situation, i mean work in a camera crew, as anything from videassist to serve coffe, how does one settle in the US to work in either films or commercials to work my way in the ranks to be a DP in the US.
Hope i explained myself cause my english grammar is a little rusty.

Juan Pablo Ramirez
1st and 2nd AC.
Buenos Aires, Argentina/Guatemala, Guatemala.
  • 0

#2 Michele Peterson

Michele Peterson
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 148 posts
  • Film Loader
  • Burbank, Ca

Posted 01 October 2008 - 02:45 PM

Unfortunately, it is very difficult to find a company willing to hire someone who isn't already local or in the area to meet. From the point of view of an employer, it's easier for them to hire someone local they've interviewed in person than to risk someone else they haven't. I've never heard of anyone paying below the line crew to relocate, mostly because they are freelancers. If you have a connection with someone already it might be a different story though.
  • 0

#3 Ira Ratner

Ira Ratner
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 558 posts
  • Other
  • Coral Springs, Florida

Posted 02 October 2008 - 04:52 AM

Hi, Juan!

Coming from Argentina, I say your best bet is to consider moving to Miami. No, it's not Hollywood or New York, but there's a lot of commercial work being done there. Plus, even though your English is just fine, you'll be dealing with a lot of Spanish-speaking big shots, as well as seeing a lot of Spanish-language stuff in production. (Let's not forget that a lot of the major Spanish TV work comes out of Miami.)

It also doesn't hurt that it's fairly close to Argentina for your visits home.

Y si, la economia es como mierda aqui ahora, pero todavia, si tu tienes un trabajo "regular" y busca una en cine al mismo tiempo, puede tener suerte.

And your English is superb compared to THAT Spanish!
  • 0

#4 Adam Frisch FSF

Adam Frisch FSF
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2026 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, USA

Posted 02 October 2008 - 11:46 AM

I can tell you exactly what a hassle it is to be legal in the US. My work visa cost $5000 and lasts for three years. It took forever to get and I had to fill in a million papers and get letters of recommendation and validate everything I've done. After that you still have to get a US social security number before you can legally work. And after all that rigmarole you're still not really meant to take any union jobs (which even music videos are now), although for DP's they kind of accept it for MV's and commercials. No chance on a feature, though.

The US protects its film business quite fiercely.
  • 0


CineTape

Glidecam

Visual Products

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

Ritter Battery

rebotnix Technologies

Technodolly

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Metropolis Post

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

CineLab

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine

Rig Wheels Passport

FJS International, LLC

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

Visual Products

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

CineTape

Metropolis Post

rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Tai Audio

Technodolly

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

Paralinx LLC

The Slider

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

CineLab

Abel Cine

Willys Widgets