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Choosing Film stock for 16mm film


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#1 Jessica Njoo

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Posted 30 September 2008 - 06:01 PM

Hi,

I am about to start shooting a film on 16mm with an Arriflex SRII

The film has both indoor and outdoor scenes.

I am currently looking to buy 400T for the interior scenes

and 100D for the outdoor scenes.

My questions are:

1. Will these two film stocks match? (in appearance when viewed on screen) As the 400 is faster then the 100.


2. Would it be easier to just buy daylight stock and light the interior scenes accordingly?
By using Blue gels and Kinos with the daylight tubes in...?

3. How much film stock should I purchase?
We are using 400 ft rolls (10mins each approx) and the film is roughly 14 minutes in length....

We also dont have alot of money and were thinking of having a 5:1 ratio of film.....

I know its tight but does 6 rolls sound enough? Bare in mind we are poor poor students.

Thank you for your time

Jessica
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#2 Ron Flex

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Posted 30 September 2008 - 06:09 PM

Hi, just thought I would say that I am also a student who is going to make a short 15 minute film.

I am getting 3 rolls of daylight and 3 rolls of tungsten balanced. So 2400ft of film which gives a low shooting ratio of 4:1

I believe it can be done but more likely I will need more. I am not on a tight schedule so I am aiming to buy little odd bits here and there as a backup for my main stock of 6 rolls. For example, there is a guy on Ebay at the moment occasionally selling various tins which usually go for around £35 each. It is left over from his feature and I don't think he has that much left. Anyway, what I am trying to say is for an extra £35 it wouldn't hurt to buy a few extra bits.

Also there is a book (I can't remember the name, hopefully someone else can) which clearly details how to shoot a film using low film ratios. Maybe it would be of some use to you. Although I did not buy it because for the price of the book I think I could get another tin of film!
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#3 Andrew Koch

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Posted 01 October 2008 - 05:30 AM

When you refer to film stocks, it's important to be specific about them beyond their speed. For example, Kodak currently has at least 4 different stocks that are 500T. Are you shooting on Fuji or Kodak? The reason I ask is that you refer to 400T and 100D. Currently, Fuji is the only company than makes a 400 speed negative stock (Eterna 400T) while 100D is a reversal stock that Kodak makes (I don't think Fuji makes a 100D Reversal) Which film stocks were you referring to?

Assuming you are talking about Fujis's Eterna 400T and Kodak's Ektachrome 100D, these two stocks will not match. One is reversal and one is negative. Reversal is significantly more contrasty than negative and reversal is more saturated. These are things that would be more of an issue than grain. However, if your indoor and outdoor shots are separate scenes, you don't necessarily have to have them have an identical look. That said, this all depends on the story and what is appropriate. If you do try to make them match in post, you will have a much easier time adding contrast to the 400 to make it match with the Ektachrome than trying to lower the contrast of the Ektachrome to make it match with the Eterna. I have not tested the Eterna 400T, so I don't know how grainy it is.

Based on your statement that you have a very limited budget, I would say that it would not make sense to shoot everything with daylight stock. Putting full blue on tungsten lights knocks them down by about 80% which means you loose about 2 stops of light out of your units. This is not enough light to get a useable exposure for 100D stock.

Are your interiors day or night interiors. If they are day interiors with actual sunlight coming in, you could use daylight film, but I would get something faster, like 250D.

If you want to use one stock, you could use a fast tungsten stock (400 or 500). When shooting in daylight, simply put on an 85 filter. You will only loose 2/3 of a stop.
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#4 Serge Teulon

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Posted 01 October 2008 - 05:49 AM

I double Andrew's advice there.
Use the T stock with an 85b filter.
Only if you want it, overexpose your stock rating it slower than it is. I.E rate 500asa at 320asa This will give you a thicker neg, it will render richer blacks, tighter grain etc...
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#5 Serge Teulon

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Posted 01 October 2008 - 05:51 AM

I double Andrew's advice there.
Use the T stock with an 85b filter.
Only if you want it, overexpose your stock rating it slower than it is. I.E rate 500asa at 320asa This will give you a thicker neg, it will render richer blacks, tighter grain etc...
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#6 Serge Teulon

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Posted 01 October 2008 - 05:51 AM

I double Andrew's advice there.
Use the T stock with an 85b filter.
Only if you want it, overexpose your stock rating it slower than it is. I.E rate 500asa at 320asa This will give you a thicker neg, it will render richer blacks, tighter grain etc...
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#7 Serge Teulon

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Posted 01 October 2008 - 05:51 AM

I double Andrew's advice there.
Use the T stock with an 85b filter.
Only if you want it, overexpose your stock rating it slower than it is. I.E rate 500asa at 320asa This will give you a thicker neg, it will render richer blacks, tighter grain etc...
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#8 Serge Teulon

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Posted 01 October 2008 - 05:51 AM

I double Andrew's advice there.
Use the T stock with an 85b filter.
Only if you want it, overexpose your stock rating it slower than it is. I.E rate 500asa at 320asa This will give you a thicker neg, it will render richer blacks, tighter grain etc...
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#9 Serge Teulon

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Posted 01 October 2008 - 05:51 AM

I double Andrew's advice there.
Use the T stock with an 85b filter.
Only if you want it, overexpose your stock rating it slower than it is. I.E rate 500asa at 320asa This will give you a thicker neg, it will render richer blacks, tighter grain etc...
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#10 Serge Teulon

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Posted 01 October 2008 - 05:53 AM

Huh!! :blink:

Don't know what happened there.... :huh:
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#11 Tim Terner

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Posted 01 October 2008 - 07:05 AM

Huh!! :blink:

Don't know what happened there.... :huh:


I do, you tripled Andrew's advice
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#12 Chris Burke

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Posted 19 October 2008 - 09:29 AM

You can do it with 6 rolls, but lots of preparation and many rehearsals are in order. In terms of what kind of stock, go with the Fuji 400T, rate it at 200 indoors and 125 outdoors with the 85. It will cost you less than Kodak and will yield a beautiful image that really lends itself to telecine and scanning. Fuji stocks do well with the blue green end of things. I have only recently shot about 300' of it and love it. It is a lower contrast film, that if properly exposed (easy), will give you tons of wiggle room with which you can do anything you'd like. . Get all your film transfered at the highest quality that you can afford. If you cannot afford much, see if they will do a cheap technical grade straight to hard drive.

Edited by Chris Burke, 19 October 2008 - 09:31 AM.

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