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Lighting for a clear glass of beer


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#1 dakkan abbe

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Posted 02 October 2008 - 03:40 PM

I'm shooting a beer commercial next week and want to know if there are any secrets to shooting a beautiful, bubbly glass of beer.

i.e. any particular lights, angles, techniques for keeping beer bubbly...

Thanks!
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 02 October 2008 - 03:49 PM

back light it (light through it).
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#3 Daniel Sheehy

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Posted 02 October 2008 - 05:43 PM

I'm shooting a beer commercial next week and want to know if there are any secrets to shooting a beautiful, bubbly glass of beer.

i.e. any particular lights, angles, techniques for keeping beer bubbly...

Thanks!

Throw some light through the glass.. back, side, whatever. It makes the beer glow in the glass.

Have lots of product, glasses and cleaning materials on hand... you usually can't recycle drink product between shots.

Remember, it's important that the product looks the way you / client want it to, so if you have to dilute it / add things to it / or otherwise bastardise the beer to make it look right, go for it! We used to 'adjust' C0ke to make it glow the right way.. ;)

Edited by Daniel Sheehy, 02 October 2008 - 05:43 PM.

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#4 Philip Ulanowsky

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Posted 03 October 2008 - 11:28 AM

Backlight, yes, but depending on your glass, light, set-up, and the look you want, you may need to put a reflector behind the glass and bounce light off it. Aluminum foil--shiny or dull side--on a card, or a silver or gold foil card, or simply a white card. Each will give different results, and you can play with the ratio of this to you other light. Imagining the glass as a simple cylinder, think of a rectangle of reflector the same width and height, slightly angled so that you can bounce light from the side. Thus, your "backlight" is actually a sidelight. Alternately, a diffusing sheet on the back of the glass and true backlight.

As for the bubbles, the old trick is a pinch of salt to make the beer foam.
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#5 Chad Stockfleth

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Posted 03 October 2008 - 11:42 AM

This has been posted before, but can be very helpful:

http://www.lowel.com...ting_glass.html
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#6 Serge Teulon

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Posted 03 October 2008 - 12:11 PM

on your backlight add some CTO or amber. It brings the warm tones out from the beer. Thus making it more attractive.
Also, make sure you have condensation bubble on the glass....

Good luck!
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#7 CAGATOTA

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Posted 03 October 2008 - 01:51 PM

If the beer is not going to move and already in the glass you cut a white paper and paste it to the glass on the back and the bottom, this will give the beer the color it is , not darker or other. Hope it useful.

Carlos Torres
COLOMBIA
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#8 Justin Hayward

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Posted 03 October 2008 - 08:11 PM

you may need to put a reflector behind the glass and bounce light off it. Aluminum foil--shiny or dull side--on a card, or a silver or gold foil card, or simply a white card.


We use a gold shiny card cut thin (just smaller than the glass or bottle) and reflect it straight into the lens.

Look at "Macallan: 25 Years" under General Reel...

http://spfilms.com/

There is a gold shiny card behind the glass and one behind the bottle on the right.
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#9 Bert Samqua

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Posted 12 October 2008 - 01:24 AM

Probably too late for you, but I saw it done on a Toohey's Beer commercial. Just like they said, mirror in the back( didn't notice underneath, but the white paper idea sounds good). New pour with each take. And the foam was controlled by using what appeared to be a rubber bulb. Like a baster, but more like something that might be used by draftsmen to blow away eraser bits. Looked like lots of work, so maybe
that salt idea would be good too.
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#10 zhangchengdong

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Posted 19 April 2009 - 10:39 AM

who can give me a picture how to light it.
thank you !
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#11 Tom Jensen

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Posted 19 April 2009 - 11:14 AM

My specialty is drinking it, staying as far away from light as possible. Sorry I couldn't be more help.
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#12 Steve McBride

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Posted 19 April 2009 - 03:41 PM

KinoFlo BarFly, definitely get one or two of those. They're somewhat made for this kind of situation. I also think that staying away from hard sources would be smart, stick to your soft sources or fluros if you can.
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#13 robert duke

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Posted 19 April 2009 - 05:28 PM

KinoFlo BarFly, definitely get one or two of those. They're somewhat made for this kind of situation. I also think that staying away from hard sources would be smart, stick to your soft sources or fluros if you can.


I ve seen a hole cut in the table just smaller than the glass and up lighting the beer from slightly away from camera.
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