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#1 michael abraham

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Posted 05 October 2008 - 04:28 PM

Hi chaps,

I am going to shoot a part of story that it's during the sunset in HD.
And one part of the story will be in the night.
Does anyone here have any experience emulating a sunset shooting?
If so, could you shed some light on how you did it?
And did it look real?

all the best

Michele
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#2 John Dekker

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Posted 05 October 2008 - 06:43 PM

Hi Michele
How about a tiny bit more info about your shoot. Are you inside or outside?
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#3 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 06 October 2008 - 12:52 AM

If you are inside and can afford a rather large tungsten light to put outside the window, with a dimmer you can bring it down gradually. The color will change dramatically, from yellow to burnt orange, which is what happens in real life. The logistics of a shot like that would be quite elaborate -tenting, timing, enough light from the one light to fill the set, etc.- but it could work.

Also, if the actors are extremely well rehearsed and particularly if you have multiple cameras, you can do it during an actual sunset, ala Days of Heaven.

Apocalypse Now Redux and Wagner each have long scenes shot to simulate changing sunset light. Maybe David Mullen knows and can explain as to how Storaro worked it out. Maybe Storaro's own auto-biography details how to accomplish that effect. It's called Scribere con la luce (Writing with light) if I remember correctly.

Edited by Saul Rodgar, 06 October 2008 - 12:53 AM.

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#4 michael abraham

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Posted 06 October 2008 - 05:37 AM

If you are inside and can afford a rather large tungsten light to put outside the window, with a dimmer you can bring it down gradually. The color will change dramatically, from yellow to burnt orange, which is what happens in real life. The logistics of a shot like that would be quite elaborate -tenting, timing, enough light from the one light to fill the set, etc.- but it could work.

Also, if the actors are extremely well rehearsed and particularly if you have multiple cameras, you can do it during an actual sunset, ala Days of Heaven.

Apocalypse Now Redux and Wagner each have long scenes shot to simulate changing sunset light. Maybe David Mullen knows and can explain as to how Storaro worked it out. Maybe Storaro's own auto-biography details how to accomplish that effect. It's called Scribere con la luce (Writing with light) if I remember correctly.



Hi chaps,

it will be on location...landscape on background...this means whole day daylight(if is cloudy it will be better).
The problem is that during the story the light is changing gradually until reach the night(moonlight).
What I am thinking is how emulate this change...and especially with wide lens.
Post-production?

Thanks chaps!!!

Michele
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#5 David Rakoczy

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Posted 06 October 2008 - 06:47 AM

Shoot at Magic Hour (which isn't an hour at all) with the brighter part of the post-Sunset to the right or left side of Frame. Cheat in a Hard Light Orange-ish Key from that side... get the scene done in a Oner!


p.s. Post in only one Category.. this is a Lighting question so leave it here.
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#6 michael abraham

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Posted 06 October 2008 - 08:38 AM

Really thanks for your reply..

because the whole short movie is when the sun is almost set toward the night, how can I cheat it. I can't shoot in the sunset time only...I can't plane the production schedule only in that time..I need whole day...I am thinking how make this transition...
and I didn't tell you one thing...this is a stereoscopic project...so,we need time,rehearsal before shooting. I think it is something really ambitious, but not impossible...


Some advice? Give up? I am just joking!!


thanks


Michele
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#7 Colin Rich

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Posted 06 October 2008 - 01:52 PM

Could anyone tell us what the color temperature of a sunset is? Obviously it becomes warmer as the sun goes down, but does it go as warm as 3200K?

Thanks.
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#8 David Rakoczy

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Posted 06 October 2008 - 01:56 PM

It depends on the atmospheric conditions for any given Sunset. Generally speaking, it goes well beyond 3200k... with a very cool blue fill side (6000 - 11000k).
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#9 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 07 October 2008 - 12:53 PM

because the whole short movie is when the sun is almost set toward the night, how can I cheat it. I can't shoot in the sunset time only...I can't plane the production schedule only in that time..I need whole day...I am thinking how make this transition...
and I didn't tell you one thing...this is a stereoscopic project...so,we need time,rehearsal before shooting. I think it is something really ambitious, but not impossible...


Only shoot early in the morning, take a couple hours off while the sun is overhead, then turn the other direction and start shooting again later in the afternoon. So long as someone is backlit by the sun, you can fake it for later afternoon sunset.

If you have no choice but to shoot around noon, and you have the budget for some reflectors and a large silk, I'd recommend flying a silk up overhead and using reflector boards to create a backlight for your actors and to make their key light a bit more sidey.

Good luck! I just wrapped on a shoot this past Sunday that was all exterior locations. I was constantly fighting/embracing clouds and sun position, so be ready to make some compromises.

Edited by Jonathan Bowerbank, 07 October 2008 - 12:53 PM.

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#10 Aaron Medick

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Posted 07 October 2008 - 01:43 PM

Jonathan has the right idea, back light and top silk. If you have the budget for an 18k HMI/or 20K tungsten head for side Key light and an Arrimax 18K HMI for back light, you'd have a better chance then with reflectors. Also if you can rig 2 20x20 silk/ bleach muslin/etc to 2 condors you'll be able to easily diffuse the sun as it moves. One 20 by per condor, to be clear. Keep your ratios in color temp and exposer and it will all work out. I know that is easier said then done. Good Luck.

This is clearly a fast, cheap, or good situation. You can have 2 of the three at the expense of the third. If there is no budget for the proper tools, you will have to shoot wide and medium shots mornings and evening, then go into close up coverage during the middle of the day.


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#11 michael abraham

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Posted 07 October 2008 - 05:08 PM

Thank you guys for the precious advice...

I cross my fingers and.....let's rock!


all the best


Michele
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Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

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Metropolis Post

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

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Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

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Wooden Camera

Willys Widgets