Jump to content


Photo

Steadicam without steadicam?


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Milenko Jovanovich

Milenko Jovanovich

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Nis, Serbia

Posted 05 October 2008 - 07:49 PM

I have a music video shoot coming next month, and in one sequence we are following an actor as he climbs up the stairs. The camera is in front of him as he goes up.
I think the best way to pull this off is by using steadicam, but our budget doesn't stretch that far.
Any suggestions how to do this shot without it? Is there a way to run a dolly on stairs (or something like that)?
  • 0

#2 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5070 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 06 October 2008 - 04:20 AM

What camera are you using?
  • 0

#3 Warwick Hempleman

Warwick Hempleman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 115 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Germany

Posted 06 October 2008 - 05:02 AM

Also, is this a set or a location, is the stairway enclosed or open on one side (or both), how wide is it, if open do you want to see into the room below / above the stairs, would the move start before the actor enters the stairway or end after it, how close do you want to be to the actor?
  • 0

#4 Milenko Jovanovich

Milenko Jovanovich

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Nis, Serbia

Posted 06 October 2008 - 05:17 AM

We are using sony FX1. The stair case has railing on one side and the wall on the other. We are following the actor as he walks down the corridor and into the staircase (and up) in an apartment building.
And the staircase is abot 1.2-1.5m wide

Edited by Milenko Jovanovich, 06 October 2008 - 05:19 AM.

  • 0

#5 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5070 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 06 October 2008 - 07:40 AM

You could try mounting a light tripod onto the camera, trying to hold the tripod gently close to the counterbalance point, so that the camera mass is just balanced by the lower part of the tripod - you could even put some weight at the bottom of the tripod legs if they're getting too long. Putting on the camera's optical stabilizer should help remove bumps.

It's a bit poor man's Doggycam, but it might be worth trying, although it may require some practise.
  • 0

#6 Michael K Bergstrom

Michael K Bergstrom
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 98 posts
  • Grip
  • Anchorage, Alaska

Posted 06 October 2008 - 01:15 PM

Manfrotto makes something called a FigRig Stabilizer, and for small cameras works like a charm. If you google it, there are people who have made homemade ones that work just as well for under $50. Good luck!
  • 0

#7 Milenko Jovanovich

Milenko Jovanovich

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Nis, Serbia

Posted 06 October 2008 - 02:26 PM

Yeah, I've used something like that (FigRig), and it does help, with lots of practice of course. I bought a cheap tripod (for cameras up to 4kg) that I'm going to modify into a makeshift steadicam, let you know how it turns out. Thank you all for feedback.
  • 0


Technodolly

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

FJS International, LLC

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Metropolis Post

CineTape

Wooden Camera

rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

Abel Cine

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

The Slider

Tai Audio

Opal

Aerial Filmworks

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

CineLab

Wooden Camera

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Aerial Filmworks

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

Ritter Battery

Technodolly

Tai Audio

Glidecam

Opal

Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc