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Nightvision goggles and infrared lamps in processing


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#1 James Steven Beverly

James Steven Beverly
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Posted 05 October 2008 - 08:52 PM

I just picked up a splicer that eliminates the need to staple the film leader to the exposed film stock during film processing for my lab. I was paroozing their website for information and noticed they had infrared darkroom goggles and Infrared lamp assemblies for sale as well (though I shutter to think what they would charge for these items considering what the splicer originally when for). I was under the impression infrared light was bad for film but apparently if the infrared light is at a 950nm wavelength, it's safe to use for all emulations even high speed film. This solves a plethora of problems I envisioned having when dealing with exposed stock in total darkness (quite frankly, I had no idea how I was going to do it!). Because their goggles will no doubt cost over a thousand bucks (IF i'm lucky) and their lamps will probably be high to, I started looking at regular nightvision goggles. I found a set for well under a $100 bucks with shipping included and I found an infrared lamp that has a wavelength rating of 850nm. My question is will these work for film processing? what are the safe wavelength parameters for processing film? My idea was to kill the nightvision on-board light source and use the 850nm lamp as a source. Will this work. Also does anyone have any experience with using infrared goggles to splice and process film? Thanks-Steve B)

Edited by James Steven Beverly, 05 October 2008 - 08:55 PM.

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#2 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 07 October 2008 - 01:13 AM

WELLL, I guess I shoulda done a little research prior to posting a few of these questions because I went back and took a look at the properties of the three main wavelengths used in most IR lamps which are 750nm, 850nm and 950nm. 750nm has a pronounced red glow to the lamps, 850nm has a dark red glow to the lamps and only 950nm is black to the human eye and unable to effect all film emulsions except for infrared film, so 950nm is ergo, the only safe wavelength for all emulsions. ALSO 950nm wavelength IR light needs a pretty sensitive camera or set of goggles to be able to see in it so although I need to probably do some tests, I'm bettin' yer Joe Average goggles won't cut it. I'm hoping military spec goggles might be sensitive enough t do the job because I doubt if soldiers want a red glowing lamp an their heads even IF it IS fairly dark red and they are sensitive to undetectable by the human eye 950nm IR wavelength light. Anyone know anything about these IR goggles? I can't seem to find any specs on them. Thanks-Steve B)
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