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super 16 and 16:9


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#1 Tom Hepburn

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Posted 06 October 2008 - 12:02 PM

Hello,

Although I?ve done my share of (Video) editing, this is my first Super 16/16:9 project. Here is my workflow:

Shoot Super 16 film

Process and transfer to miniDV tape using the 16:9 aspect.

Take the 29.97 interlaced footage and convert it in aftereffects to 23.976 fps with 3:2 pulldown, and interpret the footage 16:9, 1.2 pixel aspect ratio. I?ve also used Premier Pro with the same results.

I?ve tried various run throughs, but one of two things always happen on my computer monitor ((windows Media Player (full screen):

The footage seems too wide and the subject is stretched horizontally
or

The footage is correct horizontally, but doesn?t appear to be 16:9 and thus not wide enough. It?s kind of like (an impossible) 1.1 pixel aspect ratio if that makes sense.
Maybe I need to get a full night?s sleep and try again, but things seem a little off to me.
Any wisdom that could be thrown my way would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Tom
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#2 David Rakoczy

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Posted 06 October 2008 - 12:18 PM

Tom,

Did you shoot a Framing Chart? Without that it will be difficult to know...

At the head of each roll we shot a Framing Chart first, Color Chart/ Gray Scale second.. then the Slate.
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#3 Tim Terner

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Posted 06 October 2008 - 12:35 PM

Don't take my word for it but...... Super 16 I believe is 1.66 aspect ratio, HD is 1.78, importing S16 digitized footage into an editing suite as an HD project you need keep the original S16 aspect ration and crop in to preserve it and output it as the 1.78 (HD) aspect ratio. I'm sure someone here will come in and explain it better
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#4 David Rakoczy

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Posted 06 October 2008 - 02:07 PM

Tim is right on.

Tom, I shoot predominately S16 for 1:78 (16x9) and 1:85... to be aired 4:3 So in either case I have a matte top and bottom. My Ground Glass has 1:66, 1:78 and 1:85 markings. I usually shoot 1:85 but this applies to 1:78 as well.. we shoot a Framing Chart (put up a 16mm Lens and focus on a white wall about 4 ft out... have someone put red Tape lines on the wall were the 1:85 or 1:78 Ground Glass markings are...using the inside edge of the Tape. You looking thru the Lens telling them where to put the Tape. Then place a piece of white Tape in the middle with 1:85 or 1:78 on it to let the TK folks know what your Frame is.. without a Framing Chart they have no way of knowing exactly what you are framing. In my cases I have a matte and the Image is either 1:85 or 1:78. Be sure your Transfer House transfers this chart so you can see what is going on as well. Of course once everyone goes 1:78, there won't be a matte for any 1:78 Finals... only 1:85 and 2:40
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The Slider

Glidecam

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery

Abel Cine

rebotnix Technologies

Technodolly