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Resources in Prague and Nikon R10 Basics


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#1 Michael Koshkin

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Posted 08 October 2008 - 04:20 PM

Hi All,

This is my first post on the site but I've been reading it obsessively for a few months, trying to get as much free info as possible. I am quite new to Super 8 and have a few questions:

1. I relocated to Prague a few months ago and have been having a hard time finding any Super 8 resources here. Can't find cartridges, processing or telecine. Any ideas? Is shipping my film to be processed in Germany really going to be my best bet?

and

2. I picked up a Nikon R10 shortly before coming here but am finding myself baffled even with the manual. One confusion I have is with the use of auto versus manual exposure. Forgive me, I'm new to the medium and camera and haven't picked up a light meter yet. I understand that when the EE Lock is not pulled out, the camera is in auto mode? Correct? So if this is the case and I am shooting in say 18 fps or even doing stop motion in single frame, I merely need to aim, focus and shoot? How does the Over and Under lever (near the fps dial) function? Is this also something that should be ignored when working in auto? I plan to set things more manually as I go, but I'd like to have a better feel for what I'm doing and how the camera works.

My first few cartridge tests were with Tri-X 7266, shot inside with basic house lights (no special lights or anything). I believe when I bought the carts a year or so back the guy said it would be a good place to start as it needs less light than a slower speed film? Any advice? Suggestions for which films to use indoors and which to use out?

I'd really appreciate any advice.
Thanks,
Michael Koshkin
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#2 Richard Tuohy

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Posted 08 October 2008 - 06:19 PM

Hi Michael,
I am envious of you living in Prague for a few months!
Super 8 processing services are hard to find i am afraid. Use Andec in Germany, but keep sniffing out a bw reversal facility in Prague ... it is possible.
Regarding the R10, you are quite right that when the big dial is pushed in, the camera is on auto, and provided the needle in the viewfinder is not indicating in a red zone (not enough or too much light) you a good to film. The auto exposure compensation dial should be at '0'. This dial biases the internal light meter up or down (depending on what you might want). This would be used if say you wanted to have a roll push processed for example. You might set the dial to 'under expose' by 1 f-stop, then film away on auto, then have the roll push processed 1 stop. Or there are other reasons for using it. Say you want to use a faster shutter speed (the R10 has a variable shutter). If you closed the shutter by 1 stop, you might want to open the iris 1 stop to compensate. If you set the exposure compensation dial to 'over expose' by 1 f-stop you would be able to shoot on auto with the faster shutter speed and get correct exposure. So basically, that dial 'biases' the auto exposure system. Unless you have a reason for wanting to do so (and it is one of the great features of the R10) just leave it at '0'. (if however you find that the light meter has drifted over the years you can correct for that drift by biasing the meter using this dial).
Shooting on auto is one of the features of shooting super 8. Not appropriate at all times and in all places and for all people, but a great feature of the gauge.
If you do get an external light meter, you will have to callibrate it to the camera by shooting a careful test roll. You can't just set the meter to the speed film you have and the frames per second rate as this doesn't take into account the actual shutter opening of the camera, or the light loss of the viewfinder system. Get a meter by all means, but know that you can't just use it without a very careful test roll.
enjoy
richard
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#3 Tim Terner

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Posted 09 October 2008 - 01:15 AM

Hi Michael, try 1635 in V Jircharich 8, Prague 1 (about a 5 minute walk from Tesco's in the centre). I know they used to have most Kodak super 8 stocks in stock. The guy there speaks good English and can put you on to a lab that process's super 8. I suppose you know FotaSkoda in Vodickova, not sure but think I've seen some super 8 films in there. There are labs in Barrandov and Czech Television have a lab in Prague 4, but have never had super 8 processed so perhaps worth you making enquiries there.
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#4 Michael Koshkin

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Posted 09 October 2008 - 03:35 AM

Wow, thanks very much for the quick responses. You've really clarified it for me Richard. Thanks very much.

Tim, I will try the place you've suggested. I've made a few trips to FotoSkoda and they claim that Super 8 cartridges are not sold anywhere in the Czech Republic. (I really don't want to believe them so I'll keep looking) They do have 8 mm though. I don't think I'm quite that advanced yet to begin loading my own cartridges...I'll pay extra to have it shipped if I have to I guess.

I've asked Barrandov and Czech Television and neither has labs that support Super 8 unfortunately. It appears from lists they sent that both send film out to Germany or Holland if filmmakers are working with the medium in their studios.
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#5 Michael Koshkin

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Posted 09 October 2008 - 05:06 PM

Thanks Tim!

I went to 16.35 and they had Tri-X 7266 and E-6. If anyone else happens to be looking for Super 8 in Prague, this is the place. The people were very nice. Sounds like it could be the only place for Super 8 cartridges in Prague. They also sell developing vouchers for Andec in Berlin.

Michael
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#6 Tim Terner

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Posted 09 October 2008 - 09:13 PM

Pleased you found it Michael
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