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Electricity 101


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#1 Jamie Metzger

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Posted 09 October 2008 - 05:26 PM

Hey Guys,
I have a big interest in learning more about electricity; 3-Phase, 1-Phase, meters, volts....etc.

I have an ok knowledge, but I need to get better. I would love to find some books or online resources that take me from knowing nothing, to giving me confidence to wiring/soldering and creating my own small lighting units.

I've tried to look online, but I haven't had any luck.

I hope I was clear.

thanks again,
Jamie
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#2 Andrew Koch

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Posted 09 October 2008 - 05:55 PM

The best book I have ever come across for this stuff is Set Lighting Technician's Handbook by Harry C. Box. It is the set electrician's bible. Not a lot on do it yourself homemade lighting, but the fundamentals are all there. You will just need practice and find some other electricians to help teach you along the way.
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#3 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 10 October 2008 - 01:18 AM

Hey Jaime,

A set electrician recommended this book to me as a good starting point: http://www.amazon.co...e...8698&sr=8-1

I've read and own the "Set Lighting Technician's Handbook" as well, but a lot of it went right over my head. I guess that's why I ended up in camera dept... :rolleyes:
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#4 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 10 October 2008 - 02:34 AM

I've read and own the "Set Lighting Technician's Handbook" as well, but a lot of it went right over my head. I guess that's why I ended up in camera dept... :rolleyes:


Yeah, great book, but it tends to generalize quite a bit and doesn't get too specific on stuff like this.

City College has free non-credit courses in electrical practices in construction, and some welding courses. I've considered taking them, mostly because electricity freaks me out sometimes, and I wanna get over that.

Edited by Jonathan Bowerbank, 10 October 2008 - 02:34 AM.

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#5 Jamie Metzger

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Posted 10 October 2008 - 02:38 AM

Hey Jaime,

A set electrician recommended this book to me as a good starting point: http://www.amazon.co...e...8698&sr=8-1

I've read and own the "Set Lighting Technician's Handbook" as well, but a lot of it went right over my head. I guess that's why I ended up in camera dept... :rolleyes:


Hey Sats, thanks for the link. I actually bought this book first: http://www.amazon.co...pd_bxgy_b_img_b

It came pretty well recommended. If it holds my interest, i will buy the other book.

After I finish the book i'll lend it to you and then we can build lights together! :)
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#6 Jamie Metzger

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Posted 10 October 2008 - 02:40 AM

Yeah, great book, but it tends to generalize quite a bit and doesn't get too specific on stuff like this.

City College has free non-credit courses in electrical practices in construction, and some welding courses. I've considered taking them, mostly because electricity freaks me out sometimes, and I wanna get over that.


Electricity should always freak you out. I'll look into that john, thanks. I know the crucible in oakland has a lot of shops for welding, glass blowing, working with aluminum...etc. But i think they are pretty expensive. I'll have to get back to you on that.
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#7 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 10 October 2008 - 02:56 AM

Electricity should always freak you out.


Yeah, but it can get a bit irrational with me. Even if a breaker is tripped, or if a unit is unplugged or something, I'll still have the feeling that there's probably some hidden spark inside that's just ready to kill me, ha ha. I just need a bit of clarity on the technical side to soothe my nerves ;)

I have however built some "quality" chinaball fixtures and stingers with inline switches, so I guess I can do some of the simple stuff.

Edited by Jonathan Bowerbank, 10 October 2008 - 02:57 AM.

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