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GLOWING GAFFER TAPE


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#1 Daniel Porto

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Posted 09 October 2008 - 11:40 PM

Hello ALL,

I have found that when I peel off my gaffer tape from some of my mags that the adhesive glows for half a second as I am pulling it off. I am wondering if this happens to anyone else and if so is there any chance of it exposing my negative in anyway.

It actually does light around the area in which it glows and I find this to be really weird. Why would the gaffer tape be doing this?

THANKS
DANIEL PORTO
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#2 Simon Wyss

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Posted 10 October 2008 - 04:10 AM

Hi, Daniel

This is something we encounter every day in the dark room, the rubber resin adhesives produce light while beeing torn apart. It can influence the film when close enough. Depends of course also on the film's speed. What to do ? Look for a different tape

Like to add my most personal wish here: That the camera operators do not put any self adhesive tape on the apparatus, not on the camera, not on a magazine, no tape onto very expensive equipment. It is most annoying for the one who has to work with a sticky magazine, he who has to remove the sticky stuff from the gear. Why can't camera people not hold their head together like lab workers do ? Notes can be kept in a different manner. Get rid of the raw stock manufacturer's sealing tape. Employ only tape around the cans. Let this be white tape so that you can write on it. Do not write over the can label's information. No tape on the lid, please

We have the magazine open (in total darkness) and must not make a mistake with the film which might contain hundreds of thousands of production value. Tape is no good. No tape on film and core ! Insert the transversely cut film into the core's slit so that the film is bent over an angle of more than 90 degrees. To do this in perfection one can snip off the film's corners by about 2 mm. With an old Arriflex I'd want to recommend that the tongue be cut away once the film is back in the mag.

So long . . .
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#3 Daniel Porto

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Posted 10 October 2008 - 05:38 AM

Hi, Daniel

This is something we encounter every day in the dark room, the rubber resin adhesives produce light while beeing torn apart. It can influence the film when close enough. Depends of course also on the film's speed. What to do ? Look for a different tape

Like to add my most personal wish here: That the camera operators do not put any self adhesive tape on the apparatus, not on the camera, not on a magazine, no tape onto very expensive equipment. It is most annoying for the one who has to work with a sticky magazine, he who has to remove the sticky stuff from the gear. Why can't camera people not hold their head together like lab workers do ? Notes can be kept in a different manner. Get rid of the raw stock manufacturer's sealing tape. Employ only tape around the cans. Let this be white tape so that you can write on it. Do not write over the can label's information. No tape on the lid, please

We have the magazine open (in total darkness) and must not make a mistake with the film which might contain hundreds of thousands of production value. Tape is no good. No tape on film and core ! Insert the transversely cut film into the core's slit so that the film is bent over an angle of more than 90 degrees. To do this in perfection one can snip off the film's corners by about 2 mm. With an old Arriflex I'd want to recommend that the tongue be cut away once the film is back in the mag.

So long . . .


Thanks so much for your help
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#4 John Sprung

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Posted 10 October 2008 - 06:00 PM

The amount of light that comes from adhesives like this is really low, what's amazing is that our eyes can see it. As long as the film is in closed mags and cans while you're pulling the tape, it's no problem. You'd have to have the film right next to the place where you're pulling to get an exposure, even on fast stocks.

You could try a test. Load a magazine, and with it closed, pull some tape right next to the exposed loop. Wind that loop up to the takeup side, shoot the roll, and look at the head of it after it's developed.



-- J.S.
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#5 Daniel Porto

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Posted 10 October 2008 - 11:07 PM

The amount of light that comes from adhesives like this is really low, what's amazing is that our eyes can see it. As long as the film is in closed mags and cans while you're pulling the tape, it's no problem. You'd have to have the film right next to the place where you're pulling to get an exposure, even on fast stocks.

You could try a test. Load a magazine, and with it closed, pull some tape right next to the exposed loop. Wind that loop up to the takeup side, shoot the roll, and look at the head of it after it's developed.



-- J.S.


I actually found out about this glowing when I was pulling the tape off my pre-exposed neg! The footage came out fine but let me tell you its the last time I do that!

What type of tape is ideal... electrical tape?
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#6 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 11 October 2008 - 06:40 AM

I use camera tape on my cans or on the mags. I never need to remove the camera tape with the neg in the open, it's either in the can/black bag or inside the mag when the tape is being removed.

BTW I've also seen a very slight glow when the neg is being unwound on the rewind in a dark room.
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#7 K Borowski

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Posted 11 October 2008 - 12:33 PM

In short, no it won't effect your film, unless the film is in contact, emulsion side, with the tape as it sparks. The only exception would be film rated at higher than EI 500, where you might get some slight fog. So this will only show up with pushed '18 or '19.

Despite its more-or-less imperceptible, harmless effect, it is best to pull tape off slowly (I know I know, you have to hurry in a hectic film environment). Take four or five deep breaths, a ten second vacation if you will, before you start the loading or unloading procedure to keep this in mind.

Second step is to find a tape that is least prone to luminesce during removal. I notice that Kodak changed their 1- and 220 film backing tape a few years ago so that it is very hard to make it glow now.

Electrical tape is bad, but gaffer's tape tends not to do it very much, so I'd recommend using that.
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