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Daylight Exterior Field Lighting


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#1 Nate Schenker

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Posted 10 October 2008 - 04:15 PM

So I'm shooting a 25-page modern noir that takes place largely in wide-open country-side. The scene is a chase scene in a wide open field (think farmyard--green grass, open sky).

I want to get some nice wide tracking shots (80 feet dolly track with fisher jib arm for height) of the chase (only two people).

I'm open to a wide range of cost possibilities, but I don't think I can go much above a 300 amp genie (mayyybe a 500 if it's necessary) or 5k hmi's.

Oh yeah, and this is middle of the day-ish. I was thinking several HMI's with some 20x20 sails to block out the sun, but I'm kind of green in this area, so any suggestions/tips would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!
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#2 Nate Schenker

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Posted 10 October 2008 - 09:27 PM

One additional note: What should I do if the terrain I'm shooting on is flat? i.e. I have no way to get the HMI's more than 15-20 feet off the ground (with the tallest stands)?

Even with powerful HMI's like 6k or 12k wouldn't that cause real problems with light intensity and beam diameter for wide shots covering a lot of area? For example, if i had several 6k's on 11 foot crank stands at 60 feet off, wouldn't the intensity of the light range a whole lot from close to the light to farther off, and also, it would emulate a sun very low in the sky, correct (and thus casting long shadows)?

Again, not very versed in this stuff, so any help would be huge.
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#3 Eric Clark

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Posted 12 October 2008 - 02:55 AM

If it's an open field, and a bright sunny day, you may not need any HMI's, just bounce boards and mirror boards. A program like Sunpath might help you track the position of the sun, or you might try checking the location out at specific times of day to see what the light looks like. Of course, it'd probably be best to not shoot at noon with the sun straight above you. Does that help?
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