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Telecine Transfer


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#1 kelly chen

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Posted 11 October 2008 - 03:38 AM

Hi, I have just shot my graduation film on 35mm approximately 15 rolls of 400ft. I will have done telecine before (16mm) and always transfered to mini-dv. The footage always comes back with slight video artifacts. What is the best transfer? We do have a tight budget but if HD is better for image quality then we could stretch the budget.

1. Digibeta
2. HD

I was thinking of transferring to straight to a hard disk but how does the editing work? We will use Final Cut Studio 2 to edit.

Any advice would be helpful.
Thanks
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#2 Chris Burke

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Posted 11 October 2008 - 07:59 AM

Hi, I have just shot my graduation film on 35mm approximately 15 rolls of 400ft. I will have done telecine before (16mm) and always transfered to mini-dv. The footage always comes back with slight video artifacts. What is the best transfer? We do have a tight budget but if HD is better for image quality then we could stretch the budget.

1. Digibeta
2. HD

I was thinking of transferring to straight to a hard disk but how does the editing work? We will use Final Cut Studio 2 to edit.

Any advice would be helpful.
Thanks



do you have an EDL with keycode? Will you be doing a selects only transfer or do you want to transfer everything? How is the film going to be finished? The cheapest way for you to do a telecine is to have everything transfered as a technical grade and you do the finish grade yourself, that is if you are set up for that. Going to hard drive saves you on deck rental, but adds time in the tk suite and ups your post production equipment requirements. HD is going to cost more, but you may get a deal being a student and all. What adds cost in the transfer room is the time spent there. So being prepared ahead of time is essential. HD will be better looking and that will be great, however it is a compromise over a film print, which, depending on how things were done on your end, might be the cheapest finish overall.

chris
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#3 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 11 October 2008 - 12:36 PM

IMHO, it doesn't make sense to telecine film to DV, except for offline editing. Why would anyone shoot 35mm to finish on DV is beyond me -which as Chris said, has some artifacts and a huge drop in resolution.

I would offline on (SD) DV and do select, EDL scans to HD on a good Sprit DaVinci or better system.

As to what kind of compression aim for on the HD footage, anything is better than HDV, but it would depend what you are planning to do with the footage. I find that HDCam is perfectly acceptable for most purposes except film outs and 2K-plus digital projection . . .

Edited by Saul Rodgar, 11 October 2008 - 12:40 PM.

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#4 Bruce Taylor

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Posted 13 October 2008 - 12:08 AM

I thought I would mention a telecine route that might work for you.

Paul at www.cinelicious.tv has an interesting HD flavor. Transfers are direct to disc first of all, so there are no additional charges. He has an older tube type Rank machine with what I believe is a Diamond Clear board that increases the resolution of the scan. The end result is that you can get very near HD resolution at about half the cost. I've seen his demo and it's pretty impressive. I think it might be worth checking out.


Bruce Taylor
www.Indi35.com
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Metropolis Post

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Willys Widgets

Tai Audio

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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Visual Products

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