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Black Light in Black&White


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#1 Martin Solvang

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Posted 16 October 2008 - 09:31 AM

Hey,
I´m shooting a film in a couple of weeks in kodak plus-x 16mm (64ASA).
As an effect light I really want to try using black light (UV light), but based on everything I´ve read I´m just more confused now then when I started checking this out..

I don´t really know how to measure the light, mainly because the film is more sensitive to
blue, and because I have to previsualize how the light effects white (and other colors) in B&W..

The other thing is that i only have four fluoresent tubes with this light, 2x36w and 2x28w..
Will this be enough for exposure, or at least a touch up to my lighting..?
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#2 Chris Keth

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Posted 16 October 2008 - 11:59 AM

I have absolutely no clue. I have to doubt it's enough for 64 speed film, though. That's the kind of thing you just need to test.
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#3 Martin Solvang

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Posted 21 October 2008 - 02:37 PM

I have absolutely no clue. I have to doubt it's enough for 64 speed film, though. That's the kind of thing you just need to test.

Seems I´m going to be the expert on this within a few weeks, going into production
in one week, don´t have time to test, but I´ll be sure to let you know when I get the material developed.
M
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#4 Ira Ratner

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Posted 21 October 2008 - 06:33 PM

Ooooohhh!!!!

Keep us informed, because this really interests me! But a question:

What look are you TRYING to achieve that you're going to try it without knowing at all what to expect?

It might be that the black light gives you mud as the main source, or spectacular as a fill light with daylight as the main using Plus-X.

And both can be just what you want.

It's just that I've never heard of heavy blue filtering being used for effect with b&w, and isn't that what black lights are in the first place? Basically heavily leaning toward the cyan?

I don't know! Just asking! But still fascinated!
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#5 Martin Solvang

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Posted 22 October 2008 - 02:58 AM

I´m acctually using it as a practical in a really dark scene.
There will be some ambience in the room, but the caracter will have to use it as a lamp as he explores the insides of a
mysterious robot..
When the time comes, I´ll upload a pic from set..
Martin
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#6 Ira Ratner

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Posted 22 October 2008 - 07:14 PM

This might sound totally nuts, but have you thought at all about doing a test where the blacklight is also additionally filtered/wrapped with another colored gel?

You're getting into a VERY interesting and funky area of B&W film exposure here, so what the hell?

Are all blacklights the old-fashioned florescent types? Or do they come as standard screw-in type bulbs as well?
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#7 John Sprung

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Posted 22 October 2008 - 07:35 PM

Seems I´m going to be the expert on this within a few weeks, going into production
in one week, don´t have time to test, but I´ll be sure to let you know when I get the material developed.
M

You could do the testing you need in stills. Just get a 100 ft. daylight spool of plus-x in 35mm, load it for the SLR, and develop it in an ordinary stills darkroom. You could do a ballpark run, and shoot more refined tests right after you see what comes out of the soup.

Black lights will cause some objects to flouresce and really pop, while the rest of the scene merely reflects the tiny bit of visible light and near UV they produce. The wild card is UV sensitivity of the film, it'll see wavelengths our eyes can't, which should sort of augment what you get from the visible part of the spectrum. Because you can't see it, you really really gotta test it. There's no other way to know for sure.

All that being said, my guess is that plus-x will be way too slow.



-- J.S.
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#8 Jason Hinkle (RIP)

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Posted 24 October 2008 - 02:17 PM

i'm curious how the final result will appear in black and white because i typically think of the black light effect with neon colors like here http://www.vividligh...rticles/311.htm. i suppose in B&W you will just have certain surfaces that will be overexposed and the rest will be dark..?

i would have to agree with John, seems like a no-brainer to shoot a few stills. If nothing else just get some film close to the ISO you're shooting, shoot have it processed at the local 1-hour place. It's not perfect but at least you can gather some information about exposures and metering.
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#9 Martin Solvang

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Posted 25 October 2008 - 05:50 PM

Hey,
Thought about doing stills as test, hope I get the chance,
my problem is that the delivery on black lights in this hilbily-country takes for ever and I might not get them in time..
My calculations predict minimal effect on plus x, but as an eye light or something.. I had hopes for them as a sort of torch,
but it might be I´ll have to fake it..
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rebotnix Technologies

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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