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Tora Tora Tora in Australia????


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#1 Brian Rose

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Posted 19 October 2008 - 11:05 PM

I just saw a trailer for Baz Luhrman's "Australia" starring Nicole Kidman and Hugh Jackman, and I swear to god, it used at least two scenes (that I could tell) from 1970s Tora, Tora, Tora. I've posted a link to the trailer in question.

Australia Trailer

At 1:28 there is a scene taken from T.T.T. showing the battleship Oklahoma capsizing. At 1:45 there is a shot of an explosion decimating the quarterdeck of a battleship (either Tennessee or Arizona--in case you couldn't tell, I'm a Pearl Harbor buff too). Granted, the film is about the Bombing of Darwin, which is considering Australia's "Pearl Harbor," but why the h*ll is a multimillion dollar production using scenes from a forty year old movie, featuring ships that nowhere near resembled those at Darwin??? It seems to me that 1) the production is in serious trouble 2) they're rushing it big time, and cut in some old shots or 3) they really figure audiences are stupid.

Anyone know what the deal is?

Best,
BR
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#2 Jason Debus

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Posted 28 October 2008 - 02:28 PM

Hi Brian,

The link is down for the trailer link but in watching the teaser it appears that Nicole Kidman is telling a story to a little girl and either she or the little girl is supplying the imagery from their imagination based upon what they have seen in their lives, ie: movies.
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#3 John Brawley

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Posted 29 October 2008 - 01:13 AM

Hi Brian,

The link is down for the trailer link but in watching the teaser it appears that Nicole Kidman is telling a story to a little girl and either she or the little girl is supplying the imagery from their imagination based upon what they have seen in their lives, ie: movies.



The film is set DURING WW2 so i doubt she'd be talking about films that were shot after WW2.

I don't know that calling the bombing of darwin is Australia's pearl harbour either.

Australia was already at war with japan so there wasn't a surprise attack. They were slowing marching to our doorstep. It was however, the first and only time that australians had been attacked in war on HOME soil. Darwin was in fact bombed many times. There's also many urban legends about secret Japanese fuel dumps and airfields that exists *somewhere* in the top end, proving that Japan had in fact landed armed forces on the continent.

There was a great fear at the time that Japan was about to invade Australia. Singapore had fallen, the poms weren't helping and the yanks had their hands full.

Of course, records from imperial Japan now seem to show they weren't that interested in actual invasion of the australian land mass.

jb
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#4 Richard Boddington

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Posted 29 October 2008 - 08:44 AM

There's also many urban legends about secret Japanese fuel dumps and airfields that exists *somewhere* in the top end, proving that Japan had in fact landed armed forces on the continent.


In fact a large Japanese force did secretly land in Australia during the war. They set up camp under cover of darkness and waited for morning to invade. At first light the Japanese commander awoke in his tent to find a hairy 3ft spider on his chest! He ran off into the jungle screaming.

The second in command took over, but the Japanese met heavy resistance from a force of specially trained Australians led by Mel Gibson (dressed as the Road Warrior) and Crocodile Dundee. Both of these men where supposed to be fictitious according to Japanese intelligence, imagine their surprise when both men turned out to be real.

Gibson took out 213 Japanese soldiers using only two popcical sticks and some canned meat, Dundee actually threw live crocs!

Not since Ned Kelly & the ANZACs have the Australians seen such a heroic effort to save their country.

R,
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#5 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 29 October 2008 - 11:37 AM

Quite a few recent WW2 films use aerial footage from "The Battle of Britain", which I recall was actually shot on 65mm (as against the main unit's Panavision). So, I wouldn't be surprised if some aerial shots were taken from "Tora, Tora, Tora", certainly they're a lot better than the CGI material in some recent films. Some really scary shots of planes blowing up, propellers flying around and stunt men really running for their lives.

Both of those films had large aerial units, with quite a few aircraft - I believe "The Battle of Britain" fleet was the 36th largest air force at the time.
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#6 Mark Dunn

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Posted 29 October 2008 - 02:28 PM

"This video has been removed due to terms of use violation."
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