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DOPs Who Become Directors


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#1 Richard Boddington

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Posted 23 October 2008 - 02:47 PM

Here's an interesting article on DOPs who become directors, some permanently and others not so permanently.

Good info:

http://www.dailyfilm...ers-direct.html

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#2 David Rakoczy

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Posted 23 October 2008 - 04:23 PM

"But what I really want to do is Direct"...

Great article Richard. Thanks for sharing. It also reminded me of the many Directors who think they are Directors of Photography. :o

Edited by David Rakoczy, 23 October 2008 - 04:23 PM.

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#3 Richard Boddington

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Posted 23 October 2008 - 07:01 PM

"But what I really want to do is Direct"...

Great article Richard. Thanks for sharing. It also reminded me of the many Directors who think they are Directors of Photography. :o


Yes good point. One my next movie I will have a DOP. He's not going to have a very fun shoot is he? :lol:

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#4 Benson Marks

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Posted 23 October 2008 - 07:47 PM

Does George Stevens count? I didn't find him in that article and I do know he wasn't just a DOP and director, but also a writer and producer. Anybody else think that George should've been mentioned too?

Edited by Benson Marks, 23 October 2008 - 07:47 PM.

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#5 Tom Lowe

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Posted 23 October 2008 - 07:52 PM

Just for the record, Robert Rodriguez was not a legit, working DP who later became a director.

I think one of the reasons this rarely happens is that someone who is a director by nature would have a difficult time as a working DP, because, let's face it, he or she would always be wanting or trying to direct! :lol:

I know this is a sweeping generalization, but there might be some truth to it.
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#6 Sam Wells

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Posted 23 October 2008 - 08:40 PM

I think one of the reasons this rarely happens is that someone who is a director by nature would have a difficult time as a working DP, because, let's face it, he or she would always be wanting or trying to direct! :lol:

I know this is a sweeping generalization, but there might be some truth to it.


After I shot my one feature - which I also photographed, "Indie" directors I know said very complimentary things about how I shot it; but when I suggested they could hire me I often got a cold shoulder - I realized it could be the were afraid I'd try & play director.... which is as far from the truth as you can get, why would I want the hardest job in the world too ?

I suppose I'm a filmmaker who is 'a cinematographer by nature' in distinction here.

-Sam
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#7 Bob Hayes

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Posted 26 October 2008 - 01:00 PM

I think one of the reasons this rarely happens is that someone who is a director by nature would have a difficult time as a working DP, because, let's face it, he or she would always be wanting or trying to direct!


I got to disagree with you here. I?m working DP with thirty features and seven television series under my belt. I?ve also written and directed two feature films. Directing is much harder work then you might think so I primarily work as a DP. The fact that I have directed a couple of films made me a much more supportive and understanding DP. I know what director's need and want. I kind of feel like the big game hunter who is hired to track the lion so his client can kill it. Could I track it and kill it myself? Sure. But that?s not my career. Occasionally the client misses the lion and I have to bring it down before we all die.
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#8 Tom Lowe

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Posted 26 October 2008 - 02:03 PM

I got to disagree with you here. I?m working DP with thirty features and seven television series under my belt. I?ve also written and directed two feature films. Directing is much harder work then you might think so I primarily work as a DP. The fact that I have directed a couple of films made me a much more supportive and understanding DP. I know what director's need and want. I kind of feel like the big game hunter who is hired to track the lion so his client can kill it. Could I track it and kill it myself? Sure. But that?s not my career. Occasionally the client misses the lion and I have to bring it down before we all die.


Bob, that makes sense. I was only generalizing, and only doing so on a half-serious note. ;)
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#9 Alex de Campi

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Posted 27 October 2008 - 09:49 AM

....Although I do know of a few DPs who have directed projects (extremely well, to prestigious award level) and then gone back to DP'ing.... and found directors didn't want to hire them because they (the directors) felt insecure.
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#10 Richard Boddington

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Posted 27 October 2008 - 04:01 PM

I would also like to see some data on the number of editors who have become directors. There are quite a few of the great directors who started out as editors, like David Lean and Robert Wise (Wise actually edited Citizen Kane!!).

Plus there are a number of big directors that cut their own work, like James Cameron.

I have always felt that the editors position is closer to the directors chair than the DOP is. Mainly because the editor develops a good understanding of the language and grammar of film.

Many will disagree of course mainly because the editor is not on set.

R,
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#11 Dominic Cochran

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Posted 27 October 2008 - 05:52 PM

Crazy they left Caleb Deschanel off when he continues to work in both capacities with success.
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#12 Justin Hayward

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Posted 27 October 2008 - 08:20 PM

I have always felt that the editors position is closer to the directors chair than the DOP is. Mainly because the editor develops a good understanding of the language and grammar of film.

Many will disagree of course mainly because the editor is not on set.

R,



No, I agree. One of the most important qualities a director can have is knowing what he or she needs for the scene to work. With a good past of editing under their belt, there is nothing but benefits.
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#13 Alex de Campi

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Posted 28 October 2008 - 11:30 AM

No, I agree too. Having experience of cutting your own work makes you a more honest director.
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