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#1 Rafael Rivera

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Posted 28 October 2008 - 01:44 PM

This is just after shooting a single 100' ft load with my Beaulieu R16...

Tips for properly cleaning this thing will be appreciated. I was just going to use a hand blower, then an orange stick on the gate.

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#2 Art Leal

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Posted 28 October 2008 - 02:32 PM

Rafael:

I had the same problem after shooting my first ever 100' daylight spool on my K3...tons of dust. Then after sending it to Spectra they called and told me the film could not be developed because most of the perfs were all torn from the camera. I then grabbed some old stock and practiced loading and running it, then checking for tears. Since then I shot some more footage and did not see any dust after, at least not anywhere like before. Hopefully the "training" I gave myself will pay off.

Not saying this is what happened to yours, but I thought I'd share that with you (my 16mm experience is very limited...almost nonexistent..lol).

Either way I'd be happy to hear from others on the best way to clean it.
Thanks
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#3 Rafael Rivera

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Posted 28 October 2008 - 03:21 PM

I did practice with a dummy load, but obviously nothing will beat live training :-)

Edited by Rafael Rivera, 28 October 2008 - 03:21 PM.

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#4 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 28 October 2008 - 07:49 PM

I did practice with a dummy load, but obviously nothing will beat live training :-)

to get that much "dust" somthing it hitting th emuslion "Somewhere." have a look at the actual negative whne it comes back and you will probaly see a line somewhere. Match that to the camera and you will discover where the "dust" came from.
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#5 Rafael Rivera

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Posted 28 October 2008 - 11:30 PM

to get that much "dust" somthing it hitting th emuslion "Somewhere."


It's likely that I didn't seat the film properly in the gate. I'm sure it'll come back from the lab with great scratches that I'll never be able to duplicate :-)

Anyway, I've cleaned the camera really well and will try another roll.

Thanks to everyone for your input.
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#6 Simon Wyss

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Posted 29 October 2008 - 03:38 AM

Friend, that is not dust, those are small chips chopped off the film by the claw. To me it is obvious that you did not set the film loops properly. Judging from the picture you probably have forgotten to bring the film onto the lower roller, it run directly to the take-up spool, the lower roller (upper und lower film roller have 6 teeth) looks dustless. Or the lower loop was too small so that the lower roller pulled the film away before the claw reentered. Then, the perforation holes were out of place . . .
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#7 Rafael Rivera

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 06:52 PM

Hi Simon,

Thanks for the tip! When I loaded the camera it jammed after just a couple of seconds of running film. When I opened it I saw that the upper loop was jammed with extra film. I rewound the film and loaded the camera again and ran the film a few seconds, it looked then that the film was running well. Obviously after I put the door back on things changed. I had practice with a dummy load a good 30x but I guess nothing beats live practice :-) By the way, would you have a pic of a correct loop for an R16 if you have worked with them? That could get many of us started in the right direction.

Thanks again for your input.

Edited by Rafael Rivera, 30 October 2008 - 06:55 PM.

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#8 Simon Wyss

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Posted 31 October 2008 - 05:06 AM

Well, no, I have no Beaulieu R 16 at hand but am sure you have the common sense to see the right loop sizes. If you don't know this little thing: you can set the film on the sprocket rollers by simply pushing it down the slot while shortly running the mechanism. Another ten times and you are a practitioner. :P
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#9 Ian Cooper

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Posted 31 October 2008 - 10:06 AM

For those interested, I've just put a quick and dirty video clip on VIMEO showing me loading my Beaulieu R16.

The password you'll need to view it is 'showme'.
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#10 Rafael Rivera

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Posted 31 October 2008 - 05:58 PM

Fantastic!
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