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Using a flash for single frame/animation


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#1 jon lawrence

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Posted 02 November 2008 - 05:22 PM

I'm currently working on a project where I'm essentially using my super8 camera as a stills camera. I want to use a flash with my camera to shoot/take stills of people at night but have no experience with this. I was wondering if anyone could shed any light with using a flash and could maybe recommend a decent one to use. The camera I'm using is a canon 814 electronic.

Any help would be much appreciated
-Jon
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#2 Chris Burke

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Posted 02 November 2008 - 07:54 PM

I'm currently working on a project where I'm essentially using my super8 camera as a stills camera. I want to use a flash with my camera to shoot/take stills of people at night but have no experience with this. I was wondering if anyone could shed any light with using a flash and could maybe recommend a decent one to use. The camera I'm using is a canon 814 electronic.

Any help would be much appreciated
-Jon



the quick response is why? Continuous light will be much easier. Why not do that?
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#3 jon lawrence

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Posted 03 November 2008 - 04:41 AM

the quick response is why? Continuous light will be much easier. Why not do that?


Because I'm not going to be in a position to use continuous lighting. As I said, I'm going to be using it the way you would use a stills camera- I'm just going to wandering round and take pictures of places, people etc and want to be able to pull my camera out of my bag and shoot.

-Jon
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#4 Alessandro Malfatti

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Posted 09 November 2008 - 07:48 PM

Your idea sounds interesting, would you explain more about that?

About your question, I don't know your camera, but I'm going to assume two possibilities for you: First and less probable one, your camera has a hot shoe for attaching a flash. That's a little metal plate, usually on the top, into which you can slide the bottom of a flash unit (it has two little flanges on each side). The flash signal may be transmitted via this hot shoe, this is usually common on SLRs. Second and very probable is that your camera has an x-sync plug. It's a somewhat weird plug, which has a little hole in the middle, then it has a metal part maybe half a millimetre thick, and then comes space for an outer ring which goes into the plug. In this case you'd have to get a flash which has a cable for x-sync. They're not too common, but I just bought mine on Tuesday, at my local photography store, where they had just one flash unit that has this kind of connection, but it was perfect for my needs and cost me about 25 dollars. You could try eBay, if you're a bit cheap for that, but I personally find it more comfortable buying these things new at a store where you can check that it works, etc.. By the way, it's also possible that your camera has that shoe to put the flash unit in, but still uses the x-sync cable, that's the way it is with my still camera, but I don't recall ever seing a super8 camera with one of those, usually they have an x-sync plug, and you have to either hold the flash in your hands or fix it via the tripod mount. Also, your manual could give you more information on using a flash, if you have it (you could look around the internet, try super8.no, or just look for a manual of a very similar camera's manual).
Hope I made everything clear to you, if you have any questions I'll gladly try to answer them.
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