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exposed film storage


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#1 Tom Hepburn

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Posted 03 November 2008 - 09:53 PM

I was wondering what people do in a situation where you have exposed your film, 16 mm B&W neg in my case, but you're not going to have it processed for another week or two (or maybe longer) until you have all of your film for that project shot.
As we all know it ends up being a bit cheaper when you can send bulk for processing and transfer.

I suppose the only two options are back in the fridge or keep in a cool dark place.

Thanks in advance,
Tom
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#2 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 03 November 2008 - 10:15 PM

I suppose the only two options are back in the fridge or keep in a cool dark place.

Kodak often has a note on the subject on the datasheet, but that is the gist of it.

Make sure you seal the can/box well if you use the fridge to avoid condensation, Don't freeze to avoid Ice crystals.

When I used to Microfilm, they alwasy told us to wait a few days after shooting the last rolls to send them in if we were storing rolls from ealier, on the grounds that the biggest change in the latent image is in the first few days, so by waiting a week, all the rolls would be more consistant. I have no idea if this is an old camera guys tale or not, but It probaly can't hurt if it does not impact your overall scehdule.
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#3 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 04 November 2008 - 04:36 AM

When I used to Microfilm, they alwasy told us to wait a few days after shooting the last rolls to send them in if we were storing rolls from ealier, on the grounds that the biggest change in the latent image is in the first few days, so by waiting a week, all the rolls would be more consistant. I have no idea if this is an old camera guys tale or not, but It probaly can't hurt if it does not impact your overall scehdule.


It is perfectly true that the biggest change in Latent Image occurs immediately after exposure; it starts within seconds of exposure. The SMPTE book 'Control Techniques in Film Processing' reccomends that labs should do Latent Image Tests to see what changes occur on different stocks so that they know how long films can be kept before processing.

A highly technical article 'Latent Image Stability of Film' in the SMPE Journal Volume 36 (1941) page 374 describes aging tests on various films and found that with long term storage of exposed film the negative films available at the time showed a 1/2 to 2 1/2 stop increase in speed as well as an increase in grain. It went on to say that the speed increase was mainly at low densities and at high densities there was speed regression. Films were kept up to a year.

I would always recommend that films are processed as soon as possible after exposure, if this is not possible than as Charles says, they should be kept cool and dry.


Brian
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