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#1 Daniel Porto

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Posted 05 November 2008 - 08:13 AM

I was lighting on a short film recently and I came across a lighting setup which produced eye lights in different corners of the eyes (see picture B below... sorry about the paint drawings).

eyelight.png

So my question to all is, is this eyelight ok even though they are in different corners of the eye or does it look un-natural? Does it perhaps create a feeling of uneasiness and discomfort? Or does it does tell the audience that I am using two different lights on either side?

Stick with A or is B OK?

What does everyone think about Eyelights but only in one of the subjects eyes?


Thanks
DANIEL PORTO
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#2 Matthew Buick

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Posted 05 November 2008 - 08:21 AM

Personally I think you should stick with A and let the actor/actress convey any unease. Setting a would make the talent look lazy-eyed to me, and I think many other would be put off by setting B.


Best!
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#3 John Allen

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Posted 07 November 2008 - 08:17 PM

As Roger Deakins always says is that he doesn't pay a whole lot of attention on the eye lights. He usually lights the talent the way he likes and then leaves the eyes the way they are, which gives them a realistic look.

The French also did a study where they found that eyes lit above the iris stood for happiness and eyes lit below stood for sadness.

But If I picked from the choices A or B then I would pick A.
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#4 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 08 November 2008 - 01:49 AM

What kind of scene is it? Does the strange eyelight add something to the scene or take away from it? If it's weird to you, then it's probably not right.
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#5 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 08 November 2008 - 08:21 AM

I did 1 scene with a made the eyelight look odd. It depends on the scene but if you wanna play it safe got with A
I don't much eye light, though; unless i have a reason to.
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#6 Simon Wyss

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Posted 08 November 2008 - 02:26 PM

I don't much eye light, though; unless i have a reason to.

Agree. Question is what reason do you have? The way you have drawn it's a CU, no? Take a fashion magazine and look for reflections on the eyes. By the time you will discover that they all distract. Cover them with a crayon. See, how the person suddenly comes to life?

The closer you take the camera to a face the more you have to remove light sources. It's a terrible thing. Mastery will be fine modeling of the character without the ugly flares.
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#7 Tony Brown

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Posted 08 November 2008 - 02:40 PM

As Roger Deakins always says is that he doesn't pay a whole lot of attention on the eye lights. He usually lights the talent the way he likes and then leaves the eyes the way they are, which gives them a realistic look.


I second that - you're trying too hard....

Light the scene, let the rest happen. There are exceptions but its a good rule
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#8 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 08 November 2008 - 05:56 PM

There are times I really want an eye-light though; especially when working with lower exposure than I'd like, something to draw you into what might be an under-exposed face. Just subtly. I also like an eye light whenever the actor/actress really has a tendency to act with their eyes. But that's just me and in the end; I don't use an eyelight for ever-set up; 'cept when I think I need one; when I'll take the time and do it as right as I can.
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#9 Daniel Porto

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Posted 09 November 2008 - 06:50 PM

I second that - you're trying too hard....

Light the scene, let the rest happen. There are exceptions but its a good rule


I never actively search for eye-light. It was just that after I completed a lighting set-up I got the lighting setup B and was wondering if it is distracting to the audience.

BTW I have already finished this shot and just opted to cancel out the eye light in one of the eyes. The shot was a medium and close up shot.

Thankyou for all of responses they have been really helpful!

That idea that the french came up with that an eye-light in either the bottom or top half of the eye suggests different feelings sounds interesting, however I don't believe it to be true.
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#10 John Allen

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Posted 09 November 2008 - 08:00 PM

That idea that the french came up with that an eye-light in either the bottom or top half of the eye suggests different feelings sounds interesting, however I don't believe it to be true.


Yep, it is. I'm not sure where I heard or saw it or else I would give you a link, but I want to say "Visions of Light", but I don't think that was it. Oh and I meant to say "some french cinematographers". Sorry, that might have confused you. Eyelights are a very interesting subject, but you want to make sure it doesn't conflict with how you talent to be lit with the key. Because sometimes trying to get your eyelight perfect can ruin your keylight. Good question though. :)
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#11 John Allen

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Posted 10 November 2008 - 03:34 PM

Oh and btw, if your wondering, example (A) would be created by the Rembrandt key light arrangement; putting the key 45 degrees to one side and 45 degrees above the talent on that side. And that's just a basic rule, but you don't need to follow it. It just gives you a starting point.
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#12 Daniel Porto

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Posted 10 November 2008 - 05:27 PM

Oh and btw, if your wondering, example (A) would be created by the Rembrandt key light arrangement; putting the key 45 degrees to one side and 45 degrees above the talent on that side. And that's just a basic rule, but you don't need to follow it. It just gives you a starting point.


Yes that is true.... but only if the camera is at the same height as the subject :)
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#13 John Allen

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Posted 10 November 2008 - 05:38 PM

Yeah.
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#14 Matthew Buick

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Posted 10 November 2008 - 05:44 PM

Yes that is true.... but only if the camera is at the same height as the subject :)


Ooh, that solves a problem I've been having. :)
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#15 John Allen

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Posted 10 November 2008 - 06:01 PM

One thing about rules that I've found is this; they're not rules. They're just things to help you learn basics and then create your own look. Like a lot of times I'll just use a key and a back light, or sometimes just a key. Where as the "rule" is that you go by 3 point light which quite frankly is my least favorite look. So see first you learn the rules and then the best thing to do sometimes is to break them. The main point is to do the thing that will get you the look you want even if it means you have to break all the "hollywood" rules to do it. That's the only way we move forward, by finding the new.

And sorry, that was kinda random, but it kinda had to do with the idea that you have to have an eye light, which is totally the wrong way to look at it. One of the things that separates the pro's from the amatuers is that the pro's have learned not to follow by the rules if it means that it won't look the way they want. Where as the am's do. But I'm not saying that's always the case.
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#16 Daniel Porto

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 04:35 AM

Ooh, that solves a problem I've been having. :)


I couldn't exactly tell if that was sarcasm or not...


Check out the eye lights in this new Will Smith movie 'Seven Pounds' poster. Now thats quadruple eye light but its a poster so it doesn't make a difference. But if it were in a scene I don't think it would be that appealing...

http://www.moviesonl...rs.php?id=12848


I don't bend any of the 'rules' of filmmaking... I break them
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#17 John Allen

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 08:03 AM

Hmmmm.........that looks like it might have been created by an on camera light, but by the look of the shapes, it doesn't look to be a ring light.
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#18 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 08:05 AM

or photoshop.....
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#19 John Allen

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 08:32 AM

Yeah, that too.
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#20 Evan Pierre

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Posted 12 November 2008 - 01:31 AM

Check out the eye lights in this new Will Smith movie 'Seven Pounds' poster. Now thats quadruple eye light but its a poster so it doesn't make a difference. But if it were in a scene I don't think it would be that appealing...

http://www.moviesonl...rs.php?id=12848


I found two ten foot tall glossy high quality posters for that film in a dumpster :lol:

must have been a print error.
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