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How many days would one need to get into 600 as an operator?


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#1 Tim Fabrizio

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Posted 10 November 2008 - 03:23 PM

I have operated on 2 union features totaling about 50 days. I have call sheets, check stubs, etc. Is this a sufficient amount to be allowed into 600. And would there be a requirement to take a test?
Thank you for any insight/advice.
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#2 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 10 November 2008 - 05:20 PM

I have operated on 2 union features totaling about 50 days. I have call sheets, check stubs, etc. Is this a sufficient amount to be allowed into 600. And would there be a requirement to take a test?
Thank you for any insight/advice.


I don't believe so. If memory serves, you need 100 days.

HOWEVER, you should call Local 600 and speak directly with a Business Rep there about your specific situation. Ask for Barbara Jerome or Vince Mata.

National Office/Western Region

7755 Sunset Boulevard
Hollywood, California 90046
(323) 876-0160
(323) 876-6383 - Fax
(323) 878-1162 - Fax (Member services)
(323) 876-8670 - Availability Line
(323) 876-5522 - Local 600 Hot-Line

Eastern Region

80 Eighth Ave., 14th Floor
New York, New York 10011
(212) 647-7300
(212) 647-7317 - Fax

Central Region

Illinois
1411 Peterson Ave. Suite 102
Park Ridge, IL 60068
(847) 692-9900
(847) 692-5607 - Fax

Miami ? (Orlando office has moved)
690 Lincoln Rd. #203
Miami, FL 33139
(305) 538-9226
(305) 538-9259 - Fax

http://www.cameraguild.com/



Western Region Business Reps
Chris Graeber (Publicists)
Barbara Jerome
Vince Mata

Eastern Region Business Reps
John Amman
David Blake

Central Region Business Reps
Justin Conway
Jack R. Nealy
(504) 708-4224
(504) 324-0727 - Fax
(352) 409-2129 - Cell


It's always best to just go to the source when you need accurate info. Good luck!
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#3 Michele Peterson

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Posted 10 November 2008 - 06:45 PM

I'm pretty certain that contract services (who is the one to verify your days, csatf.org) requires the same for all locals: 30 union days with 1 year or 100 non-union days in 3 years.


If both features were union, then the production company had to report to the union who has worked how many hours. So they should barring the usual red tape, have records of your industry experience already.
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#4 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 10 November 2008 - 09:17 PM

I'm pretty certain that contract services (who is the one to verify your days, csatf.org) requires the same for all locals: 30 union days with 1 year or 100 non-union days in 3 years.

I've never heard of Local 600 admitting members on the 30 days program, only the 100 days. But it's always best to call and ask.
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#5 Michele Peterson

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Posted 10 November 2008 - 10:08 PM

I've never heard of Local 600 admitting members on the 30 days program, only the 100 days. But it's always best to call and ask.



I'd be really surprised to find out that they accept non-union days but not union days. The people who get in with 30 Union days, have to know someone, like a father or uncle who gets them in, so it might just be that those people talk less about how they got in than the people who worked non-union first and have non-union friends that are more likely to ask them how they got in.
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#6 Chris Keth

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Posted 10 November 2008 - 10:33 PM

The paperwork I have in front of me says 30 paid days on a union production -OR- 100 paid non-union days. All days have to be in the same job category.

I'd call them up but I think you should be good, assuming they're simple language means what it says (and we know it only does that some of the time)
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#7 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 07:11 PM

I'd be really surprised to find out that they accept non-union days but not union days.

I didn't mean to say that they wouldn't except the union days... I assume they will. I've just never heard of anyone getting into the 600 on the 30 day plan. I've heard of grips and electrics getting in that way, but never anyone from camera. That doesn't mean I'm right, just that I've never heard of that happening.
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#8 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 07:49 PM

This does seem completely nonsensical to me - you're supposed to get 30 days on a union production, on which you can't work if you're not in the union, in order to get into the union?

As we say on the interwebs, "lol wut?"

P
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#9 Richard Boddington

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 08:31 PM

This does seem completely nonsensical to me - you're supposed to get 30 days on a union production, on which you can't work if you're not in the union, in order to get into the union?

As we say on the interwebs, "lol wut?"

P


I'm assuming they use some sort of permit system so that non-union people can get time on a union shoot, so they can eventually join.

I'm also assuming they must have a permit system so that as a director I can choose my own person for a particular position. I mean if I'm spending my own money I don't see how the union can choose my crew for me. If I want a guy who's not in the union to be my camera operator on a union shoot, I assume the union has a way for this non-union person operate on my shoot. By buying a permit or some thing?

Or am I totally wrong on that?

R,
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#10 Tim Fabrizio

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Posted 12 November 2008 - 12:37 PM

Thank you for everyone's response. I also heard that 30 "union" days in one postion will suffice in conjuction with someone ushering you in, perhaps. And it was a situation like that where the director and DP wanted me to operate. So I guess it was fortunate to get the "union" days on the job.
Thanks again, folks.
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#11 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 12 November 2008 - 01:14 PM

This does seem completely nonsensical to me - you're supposed to get 30 days on a union production, on which you can't work if you're not in the union, in order to get into the union?

P

Most of the time this happens when you are hired on a job before it turns union, which isn't that uncommon here in LA.
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#12 Michele Peterson

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Posted 14 November 2008 - 03:24 AM

It is definitely a catch-22 to have to be union to work on a union show, but have to work on a union show to get into the union. You have to know someone willing give you a start and get you in. They recognize that not everyone has those connections, so they allow non-union days too. A production has to jump through extra hoops and have a good reason why they were unable to hire a union person. When you don't yet have your days you are working on a permit. The union is permitting the production to hire a non-union person to meet the needs of having enough people. When someone hires a permit, then they work under union contracts and get union wages.

It is entirely feasible for people to get their days, people do it all the time. If it wasn't possible, then there wouldn't be anyone left in the union. There are many ways to get your days or ways for a production to get who they want. Any production that has the money to go union, isn't likely to hire a DP (or anyone other than entry level), that doesn't have at least 100 non-union days experience.

Edited by Michele Peterson, 14 November 2008 - 03:27 AM.

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