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Live Producer/Technical Director Salary


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#1 Tyler Leisher

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Posted 13 November 2008 - 03:33 PM

I figured this was the best place for this. I'm trying to find out how much I SHOULD be getting paid at this company, or what the average is for someone doing this job.

I work in new media right now, as a live producer/technical director. We produce 15 news clips per day that are recorded live in real time, and posted to the web without editing. Here is a rundown of what I do:

Build Technical Set
- Run cables
- Configure live video switcher including taking in 3 video sources and outputting two
- Configure Audio Mixer to hold 4 channels and distribute 3 outputs
- Build 2 high end computers from scratch
- Troubleshoot and install Windows XP

Overall, building a live set to produce live video switched content that encodes on two seperate machines (in Flash and Quicktime) at the same time.

Live video producer
- Import and create graphics for live video clips
- Configure two DVX100 cameras
- Switch video live while talent gives news
- fade in lower thirds with talking points on them

Data Entry
- Perform daily video output data entry and microsoft excel spreadsheets
- Daily bookmarking and distribution of all clips we create
- Uploading and importing the meta data for clips not live produced

Overall here are some of the clips that I've live produced on this set:
(All are YouTube videos)
http://tinyurl.com/5pylwv
http://tinyurl.com/5vasva

Technical Aspects:
- NewTek Video Toaster 5 (VT5)
- 14 Channel Mackie Mixer
- Audio Compressor
- Headphone Amplifier
- Two Quad Core 2.5Ghz machines with 8800 GT, 1 TB of storage and 4 GB of RAM (Built from scratch)
- 2 x Panasonic DVX100b
- Seinheiser Wireless microphones

Right now I'm getting paid $120 a day for 10 hours of work, which is equivalent to Production Assistant rates. I'm not in much of a position to quit and get a new job (Since the economy sucks) but what do you think I'm worth in this type of job?
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#2 Chad MacKenzie

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Posted 03 December 2008 - 03:39 AM

Wow, really $12 an hour? I'd say at least $200 a day.

Have you asked for a raise? And how long have you worked there for?
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#3 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 03 December 2008 - 10:35 AM

Salary is very relative. It depends on where you live, how big that company is, how much everyone else makes, how much comparable freelancers in the area make, what other benefits you are receiving...

It sounds like you are responsible for quite a bit though and that number they're paying you seems very low for what you do. How many individuals would they have to hire to do all the things you alone are doing?

Staff jobs are tough because you're kind of putting yourself into the trap of needing that weekly paycheck. Once you start buying things, like a house and car and wife, that company has you where they want you. You need the job to keep paying for everything, so taking risks, like leaving or asking for a raise, are tricky.

The best thing you can do is look around your area and see what others make who seem to be doing what you do. Then figure out how much you honestly think you're worth and what it might cost the company to replace you. Then make an honest appeal to your boss that you believe you're worth more to the company... but explain it from the aspect of how you are helping them and what you can do to help them SAVE money in the long run because of your skill and efficiency. You may cost more upfront, but the savings you bring THEM are worth it.
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#4 Michele Peterson

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Posted 12 December 2008 - 10:47 AM

It depends upon the budget and what they can offer. Maybe the have a big budget and are just being stingy or maybe because it is an interest show, they aren't getting much money for it and just don't have the money. It sounds like you are filling multiple roles, which would make me think that they don't have the money to pay for the usual number of people, thus have budget constraints.

Also how long have you been doing this and did you have previous experience in these functions before this job? If you feel that your job performance/skill has increased, then that is a point you can make when asking for a raise, but be prepared to back it up with facts. Even though you may feel that you've learn the job in a couple months, a boss with 20+ years experience may view that as too little time and want you to do it for a year or so.

Look around for what other companies are paying in your area for similar jobs to people with your level of experience. Then if you still feel underpaid, decide if you want to take that info to your boss and ask for a raise or apply to those jobs you find and quit if you get offered something better. In the end, ask yourself if you are getting enough (experience and money) out of this job anymore?
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