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Would like some advice


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#1 Joe Riggs

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Posted 14 November 2008 - 12:06 PM

Perhaps I could get some advice from more experienced filmmakers regrading this post

http://www.cinematog...showtopic=34746

Thanks
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#2 John Hoffler

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Posted 19 November 2008 - 12:12 AM

Perhaps I could get some advice from more experienced filmmakers regrading this post

http://www.cinematog...showtopic=34746

Thanks



i'm not the most experienced person here. But in my experience, you have to get the shutter right to get the flicker, which is hard to do with normal working fluorescents. The only time i've seen any flicker is with a practical Flo with a old or broken ballast on it.

Also, b/c tungsten film is below 3400K I find that it tends to show more blue in flos. I've had to wrap the bulbs in plus green to get that greenish look.

hope this helps.
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#3 Dan Goulder

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Posted 19 November 2008 - 12:35 AM

I've gotten great results under standard flourescents using a combination of Kodak '05 daylight stock with an FLD filter. There is also an FLB filter (harder to come by) for use with tungsten stock, although I've never gone this route.
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#4 David Regan

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Posted 19 November 2008 - 07:04 PM

Can depend on what type of fluorescent bulb too. If it's a new restroom, under new fixtures, they are probably cool whites, and as mentioned can be blue if anything. I shot in a fairly new hallway on Tungsten, where the ceiling was packed with fluorescent fixtures, and the bulbs rendered quite cool, which was easily timed out, and no flicker issues.

Take a color meter reading in there if you can to give you a better idea of what you are working with. A digital still with a camera set up at 3200K WB and 200 ISO with a 1/50 speed shutter can give you an idea of look as well, especially with regard to color.

Good luck
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#5 Bruce Greene

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Posted 20 November 2008 - 02:36 AM

Perhaps I could get some advice from more experienced filmmakers regrading this post:

We will be shooting a short in a restroom, under florescent lights. Part of the scene is in b/w and part of the scene will be shot in color, we have a 100ft roll of 16mm color negative Kodak 200t for the color section. My concern is how the tungsten film will react to the florescent light, both color wise and flicker? I wouldn't mind having a gritty, slightly greenish image because the restroom is supposed look unpleasant.

Thanks


If you like the greenish bluish color of the florescent lights...great.

Florescent lights come in a variety of colors, but you can filter your camera to compensate if you wish. You'll need a 3 color meter to determine the correct filtration for your particular lamps though. For warm white florescent a 20cc magenta filter over the lens usually works well. For cool white lamps you may need the 20cc magenta and an 85c filter (the one that's less strong than the regular 85 filter) from my experience.

For flicker, an old ballast could cause flicker and it's sometimes hard to see by eye. Also, you need to use a crystal sync camera to avoid flicker. If you shoot with a spring motor bolex, you'll probably have flicker as I learned from experience 30 years ago:)

To minimize the chance of flicker, set your camera to a 144 degree shutter if your camera allows this.
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