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DIY: film processing: reversal: color


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#1 Glen Alexander

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Posted 16 November 2008 - 09:45 PM

anyone have experience processing your own color reversal film? say you have tanks big enough to process 100ft lengths of 35mm stock

is it possible to process in the field when there isn't a lab around or too expensive to get to a lab for daillies?

is there is a simple chemical "soup" that can be used?

take a minium of elements and pick up whatever else is needed at a local supermarket/drugstore/hardware store/plumbing store?
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#2 K Borowski

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Posted 16 November 2008 - 09:51 PM

Yes, look up "Olexandr" on this forum, and he is a source of a multitude of Russian processing tanks that do up to 100 feet of 35mm I think.

B&W is definitely doable, but I'd highly recommend against doing color reversal or color prints of any kind, unless just for rough rough dailies.

Color is a tricky beast to handle.
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#3 Glen Alexander

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Posted 16 November 2008 - 10:09 PM

hmm, are you referring to C-41 process? or ECN? E6?

could i do C41 in the field?
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#4 K Borowski

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Posted 16 November 2008 - 10:11 PM

hmm, are you referring to C-41 process? or ECN? E6?

could i do C41 in the field?


I wouldn't recommend doing any of them, but especially not E6.
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#5 Glen Alexander

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Posted 16 November 2008 - 10:51 PM

wikipedia suggests "...E-6 process can be done manually by amateurs with the same equipment that is used for processing black and white negative film or C-41 color negative film. However, unlike black and white developing, the process is very temperature sensitive; and the use of a tempered water bath to stabilize the temperature at 100 °F for the first developer and first wash is recommended to maintain process tolerances."


and they talk about the 3bath process versus 6 and some "hobby" kit.

you wouldn't recommend any but if you HAD to processing in the field which one is doable?
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#6 K Borowski

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Posted 17 November 2008 - 12:22 AM

and they talk about the 3bath process versus 6 and some "hobby" kit.

you wouldn't recommend any but if you HAD to processing in the field which one is doable?


Well, the 3-bath kit is no longer made, so that matter has been rendered academic.

But, what the hell are you talking about E6 for? Surely you aren't cross-processing daily film :blink:
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#7 Glen Alexander

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Posted 17 November 2008 - 12:28 AM

Well, the 3-bath kit is no longer made, so that matter has been rendered academic.

But, what the hell are you talking about E6 for? Surely you aren't cross-processing daily film :blink:



as i'm interested in using some fuji velvia stock.
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#8 K Borowski

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Posted 17 November 2008 - 12:45 AM

Well, unless you're doing "dailies" on E-dupe, you'd be ill-advised to process master film in a tank, on location. Why would you ever want to do this except to show off?

I would highly recommend leaving this to a pro lab. I'm sure you can find a good E-6 lab in the area.
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#9 Richard Tuohy

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Posted 17 November 2008 - 02:26 AM

Actually I don't see anything difficult in diy e6 processing, especially if you can get the Tetenal 3 bath (which is still available in Europe and Australia at least in 1 litre and 5 litre size). Doing it 'in the field' is something you would have to be very dedicated to do however. I have done it, but its much easier at home in my lab. Actually getting good results in e6 is just that bit easier than bw reversal in my opinion. Go for it, but you will have a hard time finding a 100' Lomo. I have several, but they are all VERY PRECIOUS. It takes ages to find even 1.
good luck
richard
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#10 Richardson Leao

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Posted 17 November 2008 - 05:52 AM

Actually I don't see anything difficult in diy e6 processing, especially if you can get the Tetenal 3 bath (which is still available in Europe and Australia at least in 1 litre and 5 litre size). Doing it 'in the field' is something you would have to be very dedicated to do however. I have done it, but its much easier at home in my lab. Actually getting good results in e6 is just that bit easier than bw reversal in my opinion. Go for it, but you will have a hard time finding a 100' Lomo. I have several, but they are all VERY PRECIOUS. It takes ages to find even 1.
good luck
richard


I agree with Richard, e6 is quite simple, I'd say even simpler than BW, specially with the 3-bath tetenal kit (that can be found EVEN in sweden). The trickiest is the temperature control, but a warm water bucket might suffice. If you can't find spiral tanks, you can always build your own (but i'd not do it in the field). THere are a few 15m x 2 tanks in ebay right now.
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#11 Glen Alexander

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Posted 17 November 2008 - 07:50 PM

Well, unless you're doing "dailies" on E-dupe, you'd be ill-advised to process master film in a tank, on location. Why would you ever want to do this except to show off?


Because when i got remote shooting, i mean remote shooting, there's no lab handy where i film.
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#12 Chris Keth

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Posted 17 November 2008 - 11:36 PM

Because when i got remote shooting, i mean remote shooting, there's no lab handy where i film.


So store the film until it can be processed. You don't want to destroy your film because you couldn't be patient enough to wait to process it. Any of the color processes is very, very temperature sensitive. "In the field" doesn't sound like it has a temperature controlled place and temp. controlled source of water to do it with. You would only end up with inconsistently developed negative. That doesn't sound like the right thing for your masterpiece that trumps all other films.;)
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#13 Richard Tuohy

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Posted 17 November 2008 - 11:57 PM

So it really comes down to the kind of result you want. If you want professional results with professional reliability, then you are extremely unlikely to succeed with diy in the field unless you have had a lot of experience with such work. If you are making something experimental, where the experimental processing is part of the deal, then fine - go for it. But in 35mm? Its a very expensive experiment ... and you will hardly be able to watch or transfer your material in the field anyway. The velvia stock is so expensive that I doubt you intend things to be experimental ... but maybe you do.
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#14 K Borowski

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Posted 18 November 2008 - 12:21 AM

Yeah, and how the hell are you going to dry it without making a huge damned dusty mess in the field?
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#15 Ira Ratner

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Posted 18 November 2008 - 05:56 AM

I enjoyed doing it at home as a hobby thing. I'd shoot some stills then process.

But for cine film--I don't think I would want to take a chance with important work like that.

The final wash and drying has to be a b**** with 16mm or 35mm. For a roll of 35mm still, it's no big deal.
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#16 Glen Alexander

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Posted 18 November 2008 - 11:58 AM

So it really comes down to the kind of result you want. If you want professional results with professional reliability, then you are extremely unlikely to succeed with diy in the field unless you have had a lot of experience with such work. If you are making something experimental, where the experimental processing is part of the deal, then fine - go for it. But in 35mm? Its a very expensive experiment ... and you will hardly be able to watch or transfer your material in the field anyway. The velvia stock is so expensive that I doubt you intend things to be experimental ... but maybe you do.


There are some things I want to film and need to know quickly as possible if i need to shoot again. I'll shoot some SLR to experiement and get the process down then jump into the 100ft rolls. Fuji doesn't make any big cinematic rolls any more so I'm going to get the 100ft rolls of velvia and have them cut in half for 16mm. I'm intrigued with this stock that results in such saturated colors. What's expensive the stock? or a once in a lifetime shot?
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#17 Glen Alexander

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Posted 18 November 2008 - 12:00 PM

Yeah, and how the hell are you going to dry it without making a huge damned dusty mess in the field?


I don't know yet but think of something Karl you're a smart guy.
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#18 Glen Alexander

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Posted 18 November 2008 - 12:03 PM

So store the film until it can be processed. You don't want to destroy your film because you couldn't be patient enough to wait to process it. Any of the color processes is very, very temperature sensitive. "In the field" doesn't sound like it has a temperature controlled place and temp. controlled source of water to do it with. You would only end up with inconsistently developed negative. That doesn't sound like the right thing for your masterpiece that trumps all other films.;)



how sensitive? how much thermal mass is needed?
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#19 Patrick Neary

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Posted 18 November 2008 - 12:21 PM

Fuji doesn't make any big cinematic rolls any more so I'm going to get the 100ft rolls of velvia and have them cut in half for 16mm.


If that's your plan then field processing is the least of your worries.

It should make very interesting noises while running through your 16mm camera.
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#20 Paul Bruening

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Posted 18 November 2008 - 12:38 PM

I thought I had the craziest ideas on this site.
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