Jump to content


Photo

Blimp Lovers . . .


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Tim Carroll

Tim Carroll
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2165 posts
  • Other
  • Chicago, Illinois

Posted 17 November 2008 - 11:39 AM

If any of you ever wondered what a motion picture camera blimp was all about, I've added a page on the web site that shows details of the ARRI Lightweight Fibre Glass Blimp 16.

It's a beautiful piece of German engineering, circa 1960's. And it certainly quiets the Arriflex 16S, especially when shooting 100 ft internal loads.

You can check it out below:

ARRI Lightweight Fibre Glass Blimp 16

Posted Image

Best,
-Tim
  • 0

#2 Matthew Buick

Matthew Buick
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2345 posts
  • Student
  • Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Posted 17 November 2008 - 03:47 PM

Looks that you did a pretty nice job on restoring it. Out of sheer curiosity, how much does it weigh?
  • 0

#3 Tim Carroll

Tim Carroll
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2165 posts
  • Other
  • Chicago, Illinois

Posted 17 November 2008 - 05:36 PM

. . . how much does it weigh?


About the same as an original Mini Cooper. ;)

Actually, it is not that bad, compared with other blimps from that period. With camera and a 400 ft load, it weighs in at about 44 lbs. In the literature about the blimp, it's noted that this was a really lightweight blimp and designed to be used by news crews who were doing run and gun coverage of world events. The news crews from that period must have been a hearty bunch, as running around with a 44 pound camera package, (which doesn't even include the microphone and reel to reel tape recorder) would take quite a bit out of you.

Best,
-Tim
  • 0

#4 Leo Anthony Vale

Leo Anthony Vale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2010 posts
  • Other
  • Pittsburgh PA

Posted 17 November 2008 - 06:35 PM

The news crews from that period must have been a hearty bunch, as running around with a 44 pound camera package, (which doesn't even include the microphone and reel to reel tape recorder) would take quite a bit out of you.


They were probably used to lugging 35mm single system cameras like the Wall.

Posted Image

Posted Image

These don't show the heavy duty tripod and vacuum tube amp.
  • 0

#5 Matthew Buick

Matthew Buick
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2345 posts
  • Student
  • Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Posted 20 November 2008 - 03:55 PM

About the same as an original Mini Cooper. ;)

Actually, it is not that bad, compared with other blimps from that period. With camera and a 400 ft load, it weighs in at about 44 lbs. In the literature about the blimp, it's noted that this was a really lightweight blimp and designed to be used by news crews who were doing run and gun coverage of world events. The news crews from that period must have been a hearty bunch, as running around with a 44 pound camera package, (which doesn't even include the microphone and reel to reel tape recorder) would take quite a bit out of you.

Best,
-Tim


Gosh Tim! I get pains in my wrist from holding a HV30 upright after 20 minutes. :lol:

Anyway, I was thinking of buying a clapped out ARRI 16S/M as a restoration project. Do you stock spare parts I'll need?
  • 0

#6 Tim Carroll

Tim Carroll
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2165 posts
  • Other
  • Chicago, Illinois

Posted 21 November 2008 - 09:17 AM

Anyway, I was thinking of buying a clapped out ARRI 16S/M as a restoration project. Do you stock spare parts I'll need?


Matthew,

The Arriflex 16S and 16M are great cameras, but they aren't terribly "user serviceable". With an Arriflex 16S, you could probably get alot of the camera apart with common tools, but you would not be able to get it back together again, not to mention setting it to "factory spec" where you could get a good image out of it. With the Arriflex 16M, there is very little you could get apart without some of the ARRI special tools, as the way it is assembled is pretty intricate and interlocking. To take the "platin" and the whole inner assembly out, you need this special ARRI right angle ratchet screwdriver to remove a screw that holds a pin in place, and until the pin is removed, you can't remove the assembly.

So I'm not sure how good of a restoration project either of those cameras would be. I do have the entire inventory of new Arriflex 16M parts still remaining in the United States as I acquired them from ARRI USA when they stopped servicing the cameras. And I have a decent inventory of Arriflex 16S parts, and some of them are still available from the factory as well.

But the ARRI tool kit for working on the 16S and 16M has not been available for decades. You may find a retiring camera tech who still has a tool set who might be willing to sell them or lend them to you.

Best of luck with it and let me know how it goes.

Best,
-Tim
  • 0

#7 Tim Carroll

Tim Carroll
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2165 posts
  • Other
  • Chicago, Illinois

Posted 01 February 2009 - 05:59 PM

The Blimp that I wrote this article about is now for sale. You can read about the sale at the web link below, or just check out the Cine Equipment Classifieds section of this forum.

For Sale: ARRI Lightweight Fibre Glass Blimp 16

Best,
-Tim
  • 0


Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

The Slider

Ritter Battery

Paralinx LLC

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

Tai Audio

Visual Products

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

Opal

CineTape

Wooden Camera

Metropolis Post

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

Glidecam

Wooden Camera

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

Abel Cine

The Slider

Willys Widgets

CineTape

Tai Audio

Metropolis Post

Technodolly

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Visual Products

Opal