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and another beauty shoot from yesterday...


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#1 Rolfe Klement

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Posted 19 November 2008 - 05:21 PM

A tunnel in our new studio. One Lowel light and NO FANS this time :-)

Starting to understand the importance of the nose shadow. There is life, breathing then the nose shadow... Actually no - there is the nose shadow then the other stuff. One of my friends assists a very serious fashion guy and they get fired if the light is 3cm out of place!

Been making progress on wrapping my head around this beauty look thingy... Also the make up artist is the most important person on set - above the DOP ;-) And they usually get paid more then anyone as well.

Any positive or negative feedback?

thanks

Rolfe

tizi4.jpg
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#2 Simon Wyss

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Posted 20 November 2008 - 06:35 AM

As my grandfather used to say: The dot on the i of a woman's beauty is her nose.

http://25frames.org/...on.php?p_id=597
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#3 David Auner aac

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Posted 20 November 2008 - 10:17 AM

Hi Rolfe,

nice lighting. What kind of look were you trying to achieve color wise? The skin tones look off on my sRGB monitor. Focus seems kinda soft too, but that could be due to the small jpeg image. I like the framing and the setting. Did you do this just for the fun of it? What camera/lens combo did you use?

Regards, Dave
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#4 Rolfe Klement

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Posted 20 November 2008 - 10:47 AM

using a 50mm T1.3 or 1.4. The look has been green / blue processed. Really shallow DOF at T1.3 or so. Fuji Vivid 160T emulation. All tungsten - no filters

I am doing this as an exercise to understand single person beauty lighting - then moving to wider shots then multiple groups. We now have a studio and some time so seems like a good idea... :-)

thanks

Rolfe
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#5 David Rakoczy

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Posted 20 November 2008 - 01:08 PM

Very nice!

Are you shooting S16 or 35mm?

Are those Grabs from the Neg?.. or an on set still camera?

If from the Neg, how did you get such a fast turnaround on your processing and transfer?

Edited by David Rakoczy, 20 November 2008 - 01:08 PM.

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#6 Rolfe Klement

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Posted 20 November 2008 - 07:11 PM

they are from a still camera - a nikon D90

thanks

Rolfe
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#7 Chris Keth

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Posted 21 November 2008 - 02:55 AM

I think her face stands out a bit too much from her body, but perhaps that's because I'm looking at the digital still. I would probably prefer the film in that respect.

Beyond that, she kind of has a case of big-nose going on. That would go away if she raised her chin a little bit. Again, on film she wouldn't be stuck in that position and moving, I assume.
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#8 Josh Bass

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Posted 21 November 2008 - 05:25 AM

well, despite others' criticisms, I think it looks phenomenal. Just like last time, I have to ask, what else was there to the setup? If I put up a DP light at the angle I'm assuming you did, it certainly would not come out looking like that! Any flags, snoots, scrims, etc.? How come that wall to the right of her face (nearest the left side of her face) isn't blown out?
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#9 David Rakoczy

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Posted 21 November 2008 - 08:34 AM

Looks like a lot of photoshop as well... that is why I asked whether this was from a neg.. or still camera.
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#10 Rolfe Klement

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Posted 21 November 2008 - 12:29 PM

exactly - the point of these are to learn beauty lighting - reading about it only took me so far... :-)

So recessed eyes, bulging eyes, large chin, large nose, big teeth etc all require a very very specific head angle. I now am getting a model on set and she is really good with all the lessons - legs turned in look thinner, chin down, eyes up, eye brows down, pushing breasts towards camera, shoulders and neck lines, chin position on top of spine etc

The light size, intensity and angle is really important as well. It is really really bright for the model - this is how we crunch the background down.

On these stills we use photoshop but we are not allowed to mask - which means that we could theoretically achieve the same look in TK

Our new studio is a car garage that we converted and it has a pit for getting under cars - we painted a dark matt color - the spectrality, glossiness and anistrpoic of the back ground is very important. We bought some cheap 8ft x 4ft boards of wood and paint them with different paints to get different results. Wre shoot against brick ,wood, glass, plastic sheets, anything really

I used a DP light with a vertical strip of light created using the barn doors - I would really like to try work with a dedo with projector attachment - but can't justify the cost now.

Flagging and scrims are becoming more and more important - especially with soft light. I bought a roll of black foil and with some clamps most things can be done (regarding flagging etc)

thanks

Rolfe
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#11 David Rakoczy

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Posted 22 November 2008 - 08:05 PM

using a 50mm T1.3 or 1.4. The look has been green / blue processed. Really shallow DOF at T1.3 or so. Fuji Vivid 160T emulation. All tungsten - no filters


Rolfe


Now THIS we would like to see.. as opposed to the D90 photoshopped still.

It is confusing when you post an Image that doesn't seem to match the specs you gave. Sure you can do those softening techniques in a Transfer Session (at a tremendous cost especially if the Talent is moving).

Don't get me wrong.. I love the still image... but we here are more interested in moving images... even if it just the grain that is moving...
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