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#1 Jaime Toruno

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Posted 20 November 2008 - 11:29 PM

:rolleyes: Hi every one, :unsure: so I finish my second draft of the first episode of hopefully to be ten, and I was wondering if is best to register now or wait till I am done with all of them. The thing is that I want to take the two first episodes and look for an agent... :unsure: oh yeah by the way which is the best way to go about finding an agent?


Have a great one everybody!!!

JTH
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#2 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 21 November 2008 - 05:37 AM

Register the script with WGA (Writer's Guild of America) I think is costs like $25 bucks last time I checked and finding an agent is a matter of trial and error. The thing is getting an agent means nothing. An agent doesn't sell your script for you, especially when you're first starting out. They're too busy finding work for their established clients that pay their bills. In fact it's gonna be a bitch to even GET an agent 'cause every swingin' d*ck in the world with a laptop and a copy of Final Draft thinks they're the next Billy Wilder. Agents help negotiate the sale price once you've done all the leg work and take 15%, some just take the 15% and many agents are about as useful as t*ts on a bull so plan going through a few of them before you find one willing to work with you THEN plan on leaving them once you've established yourself somewhat because if they're willing to put effort into a newcomer they most likely don't have the prestige or clout to move your career forward to the next level once it plateaus. Sad but true. B)

Edited by James Steven Beverly, 21 November 2008 - 05:40 AM.

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#3 Alex Ellerman

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Posted 21 November 2008 - 07:54 AM

Couple things:

1. Library of Congress is where you want to register your materials.

2. agents take 10% and are regulated in CA. Managers aren't regulated the same way and they take anywhere from 10-20%. Really reputable agents don't even make you sign a contract. First timers often have better luck finding managers than agents. If the person offering to rep you isn't in NY or LA or wants $$$ from you, then be careful.

3. A script for a tv show episode isn't going to cut it. You need to familiarize yourself with terms like showrunner, bible, character breakdowns, etc., all the bits and pieces that go into a tv show pilot (I do not write for tv so I don't know them all). This is pretty rough advice, therefore. Not sure an agent would rep a 10 episode show b/c how many tv shows are 10 episodes?

it's like anything, from being a writer to a cinematographer... if you have to ask how to get an agent, your work is probably not ready. I think it's better to focus on craft and writing something kick-ass than worrying about how to market it, but that's just me.
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#4 Brian Rose

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Posted 21 November 2008 - 11:21 AM

If you want to protect your property, but feel it isn't quite there yet to register it and get into the whole agent and commission thing yet, a trick I've used is to send yourself a copy through registered mail. Save your receipts, and keep the package sealed and in a safe place...just in case.

Best,
BR
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#5 Jaime Toruno

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 03:45 PM

:rolleyes: Well, thank you for all your answers, I had a good feeling of the kind of reply that were going to come my way, I know is not going to be easy, and that finding someone who can help and believe in my ideas it will be hard to find, that much I know also because the Spanish market which is where I want to go into and is the want I understand and believe there is potential is going to be hard to get any studio to take your project.
I don't write for TV, it was a film script that I thought it would be better as a miniseries and decide to go that route, and maybe because I came to the conclusion that film is not going to pay my bills any time soon. So I decide to stop trying to shoot more short films and dedicate myself to write since I don?t have to worry about equipment, crew, etc? don?t get me wrong I would love to do film but with the way the economics is right now, and everything going up I rather save my money than renting equipment at least for right now. :P Back to the script I will finish writing it regardless what happens.
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#6 Jaime Toruno

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 03:55 PM

If you want to protect your property, but feel it isn't quite there yet to register it and get into the whole agent and commission thing yet, a trick I've used is to send yourself a copy through registered mail. Save your receipts, and keep the package sealed and in a safe place...just in case.

Best,
BR



:rolleyes: Thanks Brian, I done that in the past I just want to find out another way that people can have access to read it without been able to take the idea. :ph34r: And I would never put the last 2 episodes out there. Just enough to get you interest in it.
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#7 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 24 November 2008 - 04:34 PM

If you want to protect your property, but feel it isn't quite there yet to register it and get into the whole agent and commission thing yet, a trick I've used is to send yourself a copy through registered mail. Save your receipts, and keep the package sealed and in a safe place...just in case.

Best,
BR

I've heard this many times, but I've also heard that this carries absolutely no weight if you are actually involved in a law suit. I'm not a lawyer though, so do your own research.
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Aerial Filmworks

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Broadcast Solutions Inc

Willys Widgets

Paralinx LLC

Wooden Camera

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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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